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New helo trainer at Rucker?

Max the Mad Russian

Hands off Ukraine! Feet too
Yeah, really, in a times when even US Marines write the books with titles like "sometimes you are perfectly obeying the order when you disobey that order" or something like that, I still can't remember a single military-related book in Russian where disobeying the orders was shown as something good and right. Maybe this nation is so deeply scared by inevitable punishment or too prone to shift the responsibility to a senior, but this habit is severly brakes the genesis of all social things here... There is russian military proverb: We are military - when ordered, we will tuck the raincoat in pants:(
 

IKE

Nerd Whirler
pilot
It purportedly reduces crew fatigue.
Did you read that in the NSTM 3000?:D

Here's a real chicken vs. egg question: is it just coincidence that helos usually land on the port side of big decks and run a starboard-to-port angle to Flight I/II DDGs and PIC station is officially right? If not, which came first?
 

Griz882

Livin' On the Right Side of the River From Pags!
pilot
Contributor
Did you read that in the NSTM 3000?:D

Here's a real chicken vs. egg question: is it just coincidence that helos usually land on the port side of big decks and run a starboard-to-port angle to Flight I/II DDGs and PIC station is officially right? If not, which came first?
Here is the “historical rumor” based on some truth...

Les Morris was one of the first helicopter test pilots for Igor Sikorsky, and he had time in the first American helicopter, the VS-300. On the single seat VS-300, which made its debut on 8 December 1941, the collective control was fitted on the left side of the seat likely to match standard throttle placement of the time. The next year brought the introduction of the XR-4 helicopter, which was designed to the flown from the left seat (again for reasons I’m not sure of...it is possible that Mr. Sikorsky was trying to follow the convention of fixed wing aircraft). Still, in these early helicopters, the collective was always mounted between the seats, unlike modern helicopters, which have collective controls on the left of each seat. Morris, being a good test pilot, retrained himself to fly from the left seat, with the collective in his right hand. In his own words, it took him "many hours before I mastered an inordinate desire to use the wrong control at the right time!" Once he had retrained himself, Morris began training other pilots in the XR-4. Morris, however, didn't want to give up the left seat and risk confusing the controls should a student pilot make a mistake that required a quick correction, so all the new pilots were trained in the right seat. From this point on, all new helicopter pilots learned to fly from the right seat, giving us one possible explanation for their position in modern western helicopters.
 

Gatordev

Well-Known Member
pilot
Site Admin
Contributor
is it just coincidence that helos usually land on the port side of big decks and run a starboard-to-port angle to Flight I/II DDGs and PIC station is officially right? If not, which came first?
I would argue the egg (or is it the chicken?) is the fact that the wind envelopes favor a s-t-p approach no doubt because history favors the right seat. Given how tail rotors move back and forth, depending on T/M, my theory is that the envelopes favor the current standard because it's cheaper than doing the full engineering study.

See also: Torpedo Decision Matrix, although that's not the fault of the creator, as he has point blank said that TDPs favored a side only because funding ran out to test the other side.
 

IKE

Nerd Whirler
pilot
Here is the “historical rumor” based on some truth...

Les Morris was one of the first helicopter test pilots for Igor Sikorsky, and he had time in the first American helicopter, the VS-300. On the single seat VS-300, which made its debut on 8 December 1941, the collective control was fitted on the left side of the seat likely to match standard throttle placement of the time. The next year brought the introduction of the XR-4 helicopter, which was designed to the flown from the left seat (again for reasons I’m not sure of...it is possible that Mr. Sikorsky was trying to follow the convention of fixed wing aircraft). Still, in these early helicopters, the collective was always mounted between the seats, unlike modern helicopters, which have collective controls on the left of each seat. Morris, being a good test pilot, retrained himself to fly from the left seat, with the collective in his right hand. In his own words, it took him "many hours before I mastered an inordinate desire to use the wrong control at the right time!" Once he had retrained himself, Morris began training other pilots in the XR-4. Morris, however, didn't want to give up the left seat and risk confusing the controls should a student pilot make a mistake that required a quick correction, so all the new pilots were trained in the right seat. From this point on, all new helicopter pilots learned to fly from the right seat, giving us one possible explanation for their position in modern western helicopters.
Awesome find, Griz.

Fun fact, the S-97 Raider has only one collective. If you want to fly from the left seat, it's right hand on collective (unless your ape arms are long enough to cross your lap).
 

Max the Mad Russian

Hands off Ukraine! Feet too
Mr. Sikorsky was trying to follow the convention of fixed wing aircraft
Igor Sikorsky, BTW, graduated both Imperial Naval College of Russian Imperial Navy, St Petersburg, Russia, and Kiev Imperial University, Aeronautical section, now Ukraine. The College evaluation report said that "Mid'n Sikorsky evidently hates the service aboard the ships and is not eligible to be recommended to Watch Officer duty since he stares at the sky far more often than on the surface of the sea. But given the outstanding academical scores it would be wise to offer him further studies in some engineering or science field". That was the way he went into University course.
 

Max the Mad Russian

Hands off Ukraine! Feet too
That same Class of Naval College, 1907, included one more man who rests in history - Baron Robert Nikolaus Maximilian Freiherr von Ungern-Sternberg, who had quit the College a year before graduation voluntary in favor of enlisting Cavalry and then, during Russian Civil War 1918-1922, commanded Asian Division of White Movement as MajGen. He pioneered the machine guns installed on the horse-driven carts, which was Wunderwaffe of that war and Commies learned that from him. Being executed by Bolsheviks in 1921, he nevertheless was a man who sieged and captured the Mongolian capital, Urgha, with just about 2000 grunts. It is not clear were he and Igor Sikorsky friends, but no one else of that Class except those two could boast some naval, military, political or engineering glory.
 

Pags

Positive Void Coefficient
pilot

Gatordev

Well-Known Member
pilot
Site Admin
Contributor
Turns out when you want a shipboard ASW/SUW helo you want one with a radar, sonar, esm, etc.
But only if you can afford it, which was ROKN's initial (and then follow-on) issue to tackle. I saw the same article today and was glad to see that ROKN was able to pull the trigger on the rough number that was being discussed several years ago. It's just a shame they wasted a bunch of other money on the Agusta birds for their first purchase because it was "cheaper."
 

Max the Mad Russian

Hands off Ukraine! Feet too
Israelis decided along the same lines, collecting experience with AS565 Panthers - their choice for new large corvettes is MH60 too, albeit earlier F-version.
 
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