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New helo trainer at Rucker?

Pags

Pope of Chili Town
pilot
I've found the MMI to be a nearly non-issue in the -135. And in the hover, the A-Trim makes touching either the FT or coolie-hat unnecessary. The transition in learning to manage the cyclic in a hover going to the -135 from a Seahawk was pretty seamless, and actually easier (controlability was of course a different matter). Meanwhile on my last check-ride, I was hearing the IP with tons of -135 time, but coming from an old Blackhawk years earlier, constantly activating the FT.

<click-clunk> <click-clunk>

Weirdo.
Button mashers of the world unite!

Click, click, click, click....
 

Jim123

DD-214 in hand and I'm gonna party like it's 1998
pilot
If you were a button masher hovering the lowly -57C (with its primitive "autopilot by Fisher-Price" that works kinda like SAS1 in the -60) or if you were pressing the force trim button the whole time, then you were working harder, not smarter.

(With nighttime shipboard ops in the students' futures, I didn't think holding down the force trim button was a very wise technique to be teaching...)
 

IKE

Nerd Whirler
pilot
I never found it a challenge to keep MMI in limits even on slope landings. You have to always be trimming with the coolie hat - the solid block of titanium that is the rotor head doesnt do well out of trim condition or lots of cyclic movent on the ground. Took me a while to finally get it. Trim trim trim. Coming from the TH-57 it was a big adjustment for me.
I've found the MMI to be a nearly non-issue in the -135. And in the hover, the A-Trim makes touching either the FT or coolie-hat unnecessary. The transition in learning to manage the cyclic in a hover going to the -135 from a Seahawk was pretty seamless, and actually easier (controlability was of course a different matter). Meanwhile on my last check-ride, I was hearing the IP with tons of -135 time, but coming from an old Blackhawk years earlier, constantly activating the FT.

<click-clunk> <click-clunk>

Weirdo.
Did you guys have the 1-D (line) or 2-D (circle) MMI? I think it makes a difference.

I never came close to busting it, but it contributed to the "fragilé" feeling I had about the airframe (must be Italian). Fully articulated lends itself to manhandling.
 

ChuckMK23

Well-Known Member
pilot
Did you guys have the 1-D (line) or 2-D (circle) MMI? I think it makes a difference.

I never came close to busting it, but it contributed to the "fragilé" feeling I had about the airframe (must be Italian). Fully articulated lends itself to manhandling.
I had the simple rotating needle - going from green to yellow - on the gauge there was a separate red limit light ...
 

Gatordev

Well-Known Member
pilot
Site Admin
Contributor
If you were a button masher hovering the lowly -57C (with its primitive "autopilot by Fisher-Price" that works kinda like SAS1 in the -60) or if you were pressing the force trim button the whole time, then you were working harder, not smarter.

(With nighttime shipboard ops in the students' futures, I didn't think holding down the force trim button was a very wise technique to be teaching...)
It was always part of my OFT-1 and 2 brief and "leadership lab" to have CAT-1s hover for a bit and then listen for the <click, click> which invariably happened. I think the light bulb would really come on once they had to brief the AFCS system and finally "understood" why clicking the button was the opposite of helpful.

Did you guys have the 1-D (line) or 2-D (circle) MMI? I think it makes a difference.

I never came close to busting it, but it contributed to the "fragilé" feeling I had about the airframe (must be Italian). Fully articulated lends itself to manhandling.
It's a line with a carrot that moves left to right. There's a yellow block in the middle (I think it's 50%), and then another scarier red line that is the limit (66%?...I can't remember). I've seen it get close to the yellow (like maybe 40-45%), but only when doing sloped landings. You can wrap it up pretty aggressively in flight and it's not an issue.

One major issue with it is when it breaks. The center hub has to come out to reattach the pots/sensor. I've seen it happen twice, once during new hire, which was helpful to actually see how the thing was hooked up, and another time coming home at 2am with a bad vibe and the MMI just gave up and broke.
 
Reactions: IKE

RobLyman

- hawk Pilot
pilot
None
It was always part of my OFT-1 and 2 brief and "leadership lab" to have CAT-1s hover for a bit and then listen for the <click, click> which invariably happened. I think the light bulb would really come on once they had to brief the AFCS system and finally "understood" why clicking the button was the opposite of helpful.
….
When I transitioned to the 60M, the button mashers became apparent in a different way. In the 60M, the airspeed hold mode comes on by default. Whenever you move the cyclic trim fore and aft above 48 kts, either with the force trim or the beeper trim, the magenta airspeed reference bug on the airspeed indicator moves to the new commanded airspeed. When flying with another PC in Iraq in cruise flight, I noticed the airspeed bug constantly bouncing all over the airspeed indicator. I asked him what he was doing. He looked over at me with that RCA Dog head tilt and said, "What?"

In his defense, he DID tell the PIs in our FSMT that he was probably the worst PC in the company.:rolleyes:
 
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