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New helo trainer at Rucker?

Jim123

DD-214 in hand and I'm gonna party like it's 1998
pilot
More importantly than this question of ethics...how long will it take me to afford a retired TH-57 on airline pay? 😆🤷‍♂️
Sorta like buying a worn out cop car from a surplus auction. The miles (or flight hours) are like dog years.

(But if I did, then the first thing I'd do is get an oil cooler that can actually keep the engine oil under the redline on a summer day.)
 

Griz882

Livin' On the Right Side of the River From Pags!
pilot
Does this dog year rule also apply to Vietnam birds? OH-6 sounds great to me. It's like a poor man's MD500.

As this is the Year of the Pig dog years don't apply. Next year, the Year of the Rat, the ratio is even better, but someone is sure to dime you out to the FAA.
 

phrogdriver

More humble than you would understand
pilot
Super Moderator
Airbus Helicopters is pointing to the twin engine H135 helicopter's 5.5 million hours of instrument flight rules (IFR) experience since the year 2000 as a key differentiation in the Navy Advanced Helicopter Training System.

https://www.aviationtoday.com/2019/09/25/airbus-points-to-5-5-million-hours-of-ifr-flight-with-h135-as-key-in-company-offering-for-navy-trainer/
5.5 million fleet hours maybe. There’s no way they have 5.5M in IFR. And there’s no way they could track IFR time anyway.
 

croakerfish

Well-Known Member
pilot
Airbus Helicopters is pointing to the twin engine H135 helicopter's 5.5 million hours of instrument flight rules (IFR) experience since the year 2000 as a key differentiation in the Navy Advanced Helicopter Training System.

https://www.aviationtoday.com/2019/09/25/airbus-points-to-5-5-million-hours-of-ifr-flight-with-h135-as-key-in-company-offering-for-navy-trainer/
Imagine if we practiced HOGE cut guns from the beginning of flight school and not just in the FRS and on NATOPS checks. Most of us suck at flying these realistically.
 

Gatordev

Well-Known Member
pilot
Site Admin
Contributor
Imagine if we practiced HOGE cut guns from the beginning of flight school and not just in the FRS and on NATOPS checks. Most of us suck at flying these realistically.
I wonder how valuable that would be in a 135, though, especially a P3. They're pretty tame in a P2+ with 4 dudes onboard and not like that power-settle into ground effect that the -60 requires.
 

ChuckMK23

Instructor, Flight.
pilot
I wonder how valuable that would be in a 135, though, especially a P3. They're pretty tame in a P2+ with 4 dudes onboard and not like that power-settle into ground effect that the -60 requires.
I think that's where OEI "Training Mode" helps. I've never seen it in practice but heard its effective.

All the marketing departments are in full court press mode at this point as far as influencing. And I do personally believe this will be an influencing game and not just technical merits and cost. It will be interesting to see the drama unfold. All the contenders have awesome offerings in their own right and you have to credit Bell and Leonardo especially for working their butt off to get IFR certification for a single engine machine. That innovation will benefit the industry for decades to come in terms of safety and benefit to operators. We should all feel great about this.
 

Gatordev

Well-Known Member
pilot
Site Admin
Contributor
I think that's where OEI "Training Mode" helps. I've never seen it in practice but heard its effective.
The training mode just makes it so you won't over-torque (and you have the power when you need it if you exceed the training situation parameters). The training mode doesn't change the flight dynamics. The -60 (at least the Romeo) sinks super-fast and if there's no wind, even pushing the nose over isn't going to be enough, so you need to settle well into ground effect before you can start really building up translational lift (assuming you're training at any kind of realistic weight...usually around 18K-ish, depending on squadron SOPs). If I was around 18K to 18.5K, I'd usually keep a little extra power on the bad engine to help mitigate smacking the ground on a hot, no-wind day with a student.

The -135 can nose over pretty aggressively to Vtoss and while it will descend, there's decent power with one engine to get to translational. Once at Vtoss, it may be possible to back off the power to below the 30 second bar and start waddling your way up and out in the 2 minute mark until you hit bucket/Vmin, then adjust as needed. This is of course all at sea level, but since we're talking Whiting, that seems appropriate.

The training mode itself just lets you either cause a simulated FADEC failure (which confuses the hell out of me, because it doesn't actually say FADEC FAIL) or simulates an engine-out condition, which looks pretty realistic even if it doesn't sound the same since the bad engine isn't all the way to idle.
 
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