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Aerospace physiologist/AMSOs

jman92612

Registered User
Aerospace physiologist

Is anyone going in as an aerospace physiologist or know anything about this specialty, or can advise on the selection process, training and duties/job satisfaction of a physiologist?

I've applied for it and am eagerly waiting for the first set of interviews in a few weeks.

Thanks!
 

Harrier Dude

Living the dream
Is anyone going in as an aerospace physiologist or know anything about this specialty, or can advise on the selection process, training and duties/job satisfaction of a physiologist?

I've applied for it and am eagerly waiting for the first set of interviews in a few weeks.

Thanks!
One works for me. Send me your questions.
 

feddoc

Really old guy
Super Moderator
Contributor
Who are you interviewing with?

Generally speaking, part of the selection process is that you should have a Master's Degree in a closely related field. You will go through an interview with a couple of APs(most of the questions are generic; correct answers are important, but, how you answer a question is important also). Assuming you are selected, (some are direct commissions, while some go through OCS) you will spend about 6 months in Pensacola, including flight school, then get shipped off to a unit for your internship. That could last about 2 years, although most finish early.

Job satisfaction? It will be what you want to make of it. APs are a small group of people; about 90 or so in the Navy.
 

jman92612

Registered User
Thanks guys. I'm not sure when or who I will be interviewing with. So far I've had my transcripts reviewed by the specialty leader and my education matched up for the entry requirements (Ph.D. in pharmacology & toxicology with a lot of physiology work) and now I am going through the recruitment process; I first have some interviews in a few weeks in San Diego before I can get considered for a visit to meet with the APs in Pensacola.

I've been talking to people in the Navy and considering the AP program for the past 5 years (it has been my first career choice throughout the 5 years I was in graduate school), so I feel that I have a pretty good grasp on the career and I definately want to go for it. To gauge how other APs feel about the program, I'm wondering how long most of them stay in this position? From what I know, it sounds like something I would like to do for the next 25 years.

Right now I am trying to figure out how the selection process works/timeline (for example does one need to first be approved for comission as a medical officer before moving onto the physiology interviews?) If there are 90 APs in the Navy, that sounds like it matches up with the 4 open slots I am told that they have now, which makes this sound like a very competitive selection process. I'm looking forward to it.
 

feddoc

Really old guy
Super Moderator
Contributor
You would be commissioned as a Medical Service Corps officer v Medical Corps. MSCs are further divided into HCS -health care scientist- and HCA - health care administrator.

WRT how long people stay in the field, your specialty leader will have a better idea.

Your interviews will happen first. If you are approved, you will be asked to swear in at some point very shortly after that.
 

jman92612

Registered User
I am planning on entering the Navy soon as an aerospace physiologist, so I have some questions from a pilots point of view. I am wondering if any aviators interact with aerospace physiologist or AMSO's while deployed, particularly with the squadrons out at sea and if so what are you thoughts? Do you encounter them on carriers or is it rare for them to deploy with the fleet at sea? What have they provided or not/should have provided that is useful to the squadrons from an aviators perspective? I am curious what opinions aviators have of these guys outside of the intial and routine survival/physiology training. Several pilots I have talked to mainly remember the physiologists for dunking them and spinning them in the centrifuge, so I would like to expand the poll. Also what is the general attitude towards providing flight physiologists and flight surgeons with flight time in dual controlled fleet aircraft. Thanks, I'm trying to familiarize myself in advance as much as possible
 

Brett327

Well-Known Member
None
Super Moderator
Contributor
The only place I've encountered Flight Physiologists have been at water survival quadrennial refresher and at the NVG ground school at Whidbey. They generally don't interact with squadron personnel.

Brett
 

skidkid

CAS Czar
pilot
Super Moderator
Contributor
We had one assigned to the MAG at Camp Pendleton. They would write hazreps, show us cool comfortable gear we may or may not get and teach a couple Spatial d classes at Insturment Ground School as well as run the NVG lab and supervise the laser safety programs, fair amount of interaction.
I dont think they flew very often but they flew.
 

HeyJoe

Fly Navy! ...or USMC
None
Super Moderator
Contributor
Aviation Physiologists

I am wondering if any aviators interact with aerospace physiologist or AMSO's while deployed, particularly with the squadrons out at sea and if so what are you thoughts?
First off, an Aeromedical Safety Officer (AMSO) is an Aerospace Physiologist who goes through additional training to qualify as an AMSO and then serves primarily at USMC Wing or Group level in addition to other select staff positions. The Navy also has parallel billets and the entire AMSO community stays very engaged on ALSS issues through the Fleet Air Indoctrination and Liaison of Survival Aircrew Flight Equipment (FAILSAFE) program. Check out some of the biographies on these leading Aerospace Physiologists and you can see where their careers have taken them. Note how many how qualified as AMSOs and where they served.

By personal experience, I never knew AMSOs existed until I served at Safety Center as editor of Approach and got immersed in ALSS issues. Every aviator gets to know the Aerospace Physiogists though because they run the Naval Aviation Survival Training Program (NASTP) that every aviator goes through initially and revisits for requalification. Now that I know the role of the AMSO, I have seen them engaged all over the map (in fact, I just met the CNAF/CNAL AMSO today while visiting Norfolk and compared perspectives). I've seen some AMSOs in Ready Rooms and flying regularly with the squadrons they support while others remain in staff spaces. It's really what the AMSO decides to make of the assignment. PM me if you want to get connected to any of the folks out there. Cheers and have fun, HJ


BTW - if you haven't seen the latest Aerospace Physiologist website, check it out. They're working on a forum there as well.
 

Tom

Well-Known Member
pilot
Contributor
I scrolled down and thought, "Hey they must have updated the page because I don't see the girl." After the triple take I now understand.
 
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