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3 mile run waiver for higher elevations?

8WOOD

New Member
I just recently did my initial PFT for Marines obviously. I ran a 19.26. When i crossed the line the OSO said good job you just got a 300--my pull-ups and sit-ups were perfect. He said that for high elevations (4,880 feet where I am) there is a minute and a half waiver. I've never heard of this before.

My question is has anyone one else heard of this wavier?
 

skidkid

CAS Czar
pilot
Super Moderator
Contributor
Yes. OSOs don't usually blow much sunshine up potential candidates asses.
 

lmnop

Active Member
I just recently did my initial PFT for Marines obviously. I ran a 19.26. When i crossed the line the OSO said good job you just got a 300--my pull-ups and sit-ups were perfect. He said that for hi elevations (4,880 feet where I am) there is a minute and a half waiver. I've never heard of this before.

My question is has anyone one else heard of this wavier?
It's in Appendix H of MCO P6100.12 if you want to check it out. The altitude run table for the Marine Corps applies above 4500 feet and adds 1:30. Interestingly, the Navy altitude run chart applies above 5000, but the PRT is half the distance so maybe it should change to 9000.
 

8WOOD

New Member
Thanks for all your comments. I just noticed that I spelled elevation totally wrong.

And, yeah I also should have put 3-mile run waiver for high elevation. I guess I'll go back and edit now.
 

2ndGen

Third times a charm
I get the same thing becuase I'm from Colorado, but from what I here, your not going to run in faster at sea level in Quantico. I always figure my run time as what it is (for what my indoc PFT would be).

If you count that the air is much harder to breath because it has a lot more moisture in it, and your tired, plus your body only needs about three days to adjust to the difference in O2, you wont be running any faster.
 

Cron

Yarr
You can download a handy PFT calculator from here. If you indicate you're training at high elevation, your scores get computed accordingly.
 

HH-60H

Manager
pilot
Super Moderator
Contributor
Eventually, someone is going to spell elevation correctly in the title.
 

8WOOD

New Member
Eventually, someone is going to spell elevation correctly in the title.

Yeah funny thing is I accidentally spelled it "elivation" originally, when I noticed it, I made a post about my discrepancy and a moderator changed it--but he spelled it wrong too. Good times
 

echo4nasty

New Member
When I was returning from Afghanistan I had to run a PFT at Bagram Air Base before we came home (there was no pft requirement to return to the states, though we should consider it) I ran a 22 min 3 mile. I forget what the elevation was there but they subtracted 2 minutes for elevation. Naturally I was happy, as this was my last PFT before my eas and I would leave the Marine Corps with my last PFT being my highest.
 

ArkhamAsylum

500+ Posts
pilot
If you take a PFT at a low elevation where the Earth's gravitational pull is strongest, can you get a waiver for pull-ups?
 

TrunkMonkey

Spy Navy
When I was returning from Afghanistan I had to run a PFT at Bagram Air Base before we came home (there was no pft requirement to return to the states, though we should consider it) I ran a 22 min 3 mile. I forget what the elevation was there but they subtracted 2 minutes for elevation. Naturally I was happy, as this was my last PFT before my eas and I would leave the Marine Corps with my last PFT being my highest.
I did the same thing. Bagram is just at 5K', so for the Navy, the high-altitude PRT chart applies, which gives you about 1.5 minutes extra.
 
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