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Which Specialty should I be pushing for? Navy Reserve Officer

bubblehead

Registered Member
Contributor
#16
Are they short on JAGs or something?
They are not stupid like the Navy with certain things. I actually helped a friend of mine who was an attorney during the day and a Navy Reserve 1835. He wanted to be a Navy JAG but was told, "sorry, we only take Reserve JAGs who were previously active duty JAGs." He spoke with the Air Force Reserve and they welcomed him with open arms. So, I helped him put together an interservice transfer package.

He's now an Air Force Reserve JAG.

+1 Air Force
-1 Navy
 

Sculpin

Active Member
#17
They are not stupid like the Navy with certain things. I actually helped a friend of mine who was an attorney during the day and a Navy Reserve 1835. He wanted to be a Navy JAG but was told, "sorry, we only take Reserve JAGs who were previously active duty JAGs." He spoke with the Air Force Reserve and they welcomed him with open arms. So, I helped him put together an interservice transfer package.

He's now an Air Force Reserve JAG.

+1 Air Force
-1 Navy
I guess he wasn't very fond of Powerpoint. ;) Joking aside, between his training and a future MOB, wouldn't he be at a year active duty time and could have transferred to JAG? The one year requirement is an odd statute, especially when it doesn't appear to be the same for other Staff Corps types (please correct me if I am mistaken), but good for him he found a new home that works out for him. Still, you can't beat Navy base locations. Would you rather be in San Diego, CA or Minot, ND? Very easy decision for me personally. And I can't imagine there being good beer in Minot.
 

Hair Warrior

JO 1835
Contributor
#18
It’s better to let lawyers (who want to serve in any role) be lawyers, rather than have them become intel officers. There‘s less skill overlap than you’d think.
 
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Flash

SEVAL/ECMO
None
Super Moderator
Contributor
#19
They are not stupid like the Navy with certain things. I actually helped a friend of mine who was an attorney during the day and a Navy Reserve 1835. He wanted to be a Navy JAG but was told, "sorry, we only take Reserve JAGs who were previously active duty JAGs."
The Navy almost certainly has that requirement because they can afford to, and they save money by not having to train a JAG from scratch. Maybe not so stupid after all.

The one year requirement is an odd statute, especially when it doesn't appear to be the same for other Staff Corps types...
Not necessarily, some of the JAG’s I was MOB’d with had a lot more responsibility than a ‘regular’ O-3/4 from ROE to contracting.

It’s better to let lawyers (who want to serve in any role) be lawyers, rather than have them become intel officers. There‘s less skill overlap than you’d think.
Yeah, not really. Intel officer ain’t that hard a skill to learn and if folks have passed law school and can get commissioned they’ll likely be fine Intel O’s.
 

Flash

SEVAL/ECMO
None
Super Moderator
Contributor
#22
There is very little overlap between lawyers and intel officers. It would be like comparing lifeguards to police officers.
Well yeah, since lawyers usually have more schooling, a professional certification and often spend years specializing in a particular area of the law or a related field.

Very little overlap.
 

Sculpin

Active Member
#23
Honestly, none of the IDWO designators are "hard" to learn.
Interesting. Do you tell other IWC folks what they do isn't "hard" to learn?

Some people have told me EDO in the Reserve requires a lot of fast learning and ramping up with a substantial learning curve, others say it's not bad at all. Will report back in several years once I get qualified.
 

bubblehead

Registered Member
Contributor
#24
Interesting. Do you tell other IWC folks what they do isn't "hard" to learn?
There is no need to tell anyone anything, it's a known quantity. If you graduated from college and made it through the DCO selection process, you will do well in practically any Reserve designator. This is not the NUC pipeline.

By "well", I mean you will be able to graduate from the particular training for your designator, as well as will be able to "pass" you PQS and board. Doing "well" career wise requires you to do your job well, as well as to do the collateral things that are required of Officers in the Reserve: admin officer, training officer, ops officer, etc.

At least for Intel/CW/IP, you are provided with "gouge booklets" for your PQS and board, are put through multiple "murder boards" (i.e., mock qual boards), and are given multiple opportunities to "pass."

For me, at least, having gone through the "experience" that is comprised of mess cranking, qualifying in submarines, and going to dive school, I've not found the Reserve to be particularly difficult nor challenging. Then again, my bar is always set high which is my fault.

All of the DCO folks I've come across are either straight up civilians or people like me with prior experience. Despite their day jobs (e.g., teacher, FLEO, banker, attorney, lawn care business owner, sales person, college IT employee, govvie employee) they have all become fully qualified in their designators. They are all smart and driven.
 
#29
As much as I like to pick on Navy Intel O's....nope.
Care to elaborate?

If you are working in an OPINTEL production center like a JIOC, Maritime Watch (CTF-74, PACFLT, C3F, etc), or you are underway in CVIC or with the DESRON than it is almost entirely Powerpoint based production on a 24 hour cycle (sometimes 72 hour or weekly). So the main job is making a morning intelligence briefs for distribution.

There may be one or two 24 month tours not doing that throughout a 20 year career but OPINTEL is the core competency.
 
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Flash

SEVAL/ECMO
None
Super Moderator
Contributor
#30
Care to elaborate?

If you are working in an OPINTEL production center like a JIOC, Maritime Watch (CTF-74, PACFLT, C3F, etc), or you are underway in CVIC or with the DESRON than it is almost entirely Powerpoint based production on a 24 hour cycle (sometimes 72 hour or weekly). So the main job is making a morning intelligence briefs for distribution.

There may be one or two 24 month tours not doing that throughout a 20 year career but OPINTEL is the core competency.
OPINTEL may be a core competency but having worked alongside Navy Intel O’s almost my whole career they do far more than “mostly PowerPoint”.
 
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