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What is the purpose of 5 days of no working out prior to NAMI?

#1
Question is in the topic, I'm just wondering if anyone can shed some light on this. I'm heading down to Pensacola on Sunday for my flight physical (finally), and then I'll be contracting shortly after. Due to some work obligations I already had to miss 5 days at the gym, so I'm anxious not to miss any more than I need to. Does anyone know if the 5 day rule is just to make sure we don't show up with a lingering injury, or is it related to how our blood tests results may come back? My dad is a doctor and when I asked him he had no idea why physical activity would affect the checkup, especially when the patient is used to working out daily. If this has been asked before I apologize, I just couldn't find anything! Any Info is appreciated, I just want to see if I can still go for easy runs/light workouts or if no activity at all is necessary. Thanks in advance for the help as well as all the other information I've learned on here.
 

picklesuit

Shit, I'm lost again...
pilot
Contributor
#2
Probably liver byproducts in the urine/bloodstream. Purposely inflicting tissue damage and forcing your body to heal it (getting swole) can throw off your blood work.
 

Pags

Well-Known Member
pilot
#3
Question is in the topic, I'm just wondering if anyone can shed some light on this. I'm heading down to Pensacola on Sunday for my flight physical (finally), and then I'll be contracting shortly after. Due to some work obligations I already had to miss 5 days at the gym, so I'm anxious not to miss any more than I need to. Does anyone know if the 5 day rule is just to make sure we don't show up with a lingering injury, or is it related to how our blood tests results may come back? My dad is a doctor and when I asked him he had no idea why physical activity would affect the checkup, especially when the patient is used to working out daily. If this has been asked before I apologize, I just couldn't find anything! Any Info is appreciated, I just want to see if I can still go for easy runs/light workouts or if no activity at all is necessary. Thanks in advance for the help as well as all the other information I've learned on here.
Just do what you're told. Missing a few days isn't the end of the world.
 

TimeBomb

Noise, vibration and harshness
#5
Pickle has it. Strenuous exercise can raise levels of "liver enzymes" in the blood. The enzymes are also contained in muscle, so a bit of muscle damage causes higher level of these enzymes in the blood. Giant workouts can also cause blood and protein to show up in the urine. Save yourself a lot of potential pain and take the advice. Any abnormality in your blood/urine has to get worked up, and the closer the look, the greater the chance of finding something unrelated but disqualifying.
R/
 

picklesuit

Shit, I'm lost again...
pilot
Contributor
#8
Pickle has it. Strenuous exercise can raise levels of "liver enzymes" in the blood. The enzymes are also contained in muscle, so a bit of muscle damage causes higher level of these enzymes in the blood. Giant workouts can also cause blood and protein to show up in the urine. Save yourself a lot of potential pain and take the advice. Any abnormality in your blood/urine has to get worked up, and the closer the look, the greater the chance of finding something unrelated but disqualifying.
R/
Hah!
Not bad for an Animal Science major 15 years after I got my degree...
Guess I haven’t killed ALL of those penguins.
Pickle
 
#9
Just for anyone else who comes along asking the same question, I got an official answer when I was down in Pensacola. Working out and other strenuous activities leave trace amounts of red blood cells in your urine, which apparently can be caused by other bad stuff, so they want as little RBC's in your urine as possible.