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What are you reading?

Gonna dump some books I've read in the last few months here, definitely recommend them all.

Matterhorn by Karl Marlantes: Great novel set in Vietnam, raw and brutal. For the helo guys there's a couple cool passages about how bad ass the phrog pilots were.

Bogeys and Bandits by Robert Gandt: Follows a class of freshly winged F/A-18 pilots in the the mid-nineties as they get through the FRS. The descriptions of the carrier trap quals were very cool. If you like jets, worth a read.

Newly Commissioned Naval Officer's Guide by CDR Fred Kacher, USN: Seems like required reading.

The Fleet at Flood Tide by James D. Hornfischer: At first I was intimidated by the tome-esque quality of the paperback but the writing is sharp and interesting. It is a popular history of the Navy as we tightened the belt around Japan, 1944-45. It doesn't feel too colloquial like some popular histories, definitely fleshed out and that is to the book's favor.
 

Pags

Well-Known Member
pilot
Gonna dump some books I've read in the last few months here, definitely recommend them all.

Matterhorn by Karl Marlantes: Great novel set in Vietnam, raw and brutal. For the helo guys there's a couple cool passages about how bad ass the phrog pilots were.

Bogeys and Bandits by Robert Gandt: Follows a class of freshly winged F/A-18 pilots in the the mid-nineties as they get through the FRS. The descriptions of the carrier trap quals were very cool. If you like jets, worth a read.

Newly Commissioned Naval Officer's Guide by CDR Fred Kacher, USN: Seems like required reading.

The Fleet at Flood Tide by James D. Hornfischer: At first I was intimidated by the tome-esque quality of the paperback but the writing is sharp and interesting. It is a popular history of the Navy as we tightened the belt around Japan, 1944-45. It doesn't feel too colloquial like some popular histories, definitely fleshed out and that is to the book's favor.
If you like Naval History you should read everything that Hornfischer and Toll write. Both are great authors and their works are very approachable and enjoyable.
 
Currently going through The War Below: The Story of Three Submarines That Battled Japan by James Scott.

I'm only about half done, so I don't know if this is covered later or what, but I hope the author goes more deeply into the defective torpedo issue and how it was rectified/improved upon at some point.
 

nittany03

FUBIJAR
pilot
None
Super Moderator
Contributor
The Fleet at Flood Tide by James D. Hornfischer: At first I was intimidated by the tome-esque quality of the paperback but the writing is sharp and interesting. It is a popular history of the Navy as we tightened the belt around Japan, 1944-45. It doesn't feel too colloquial like some popular histories, definitely fleshed out and that is to the book's favor.
Hmm. I'll have to add that to the list, as I'm just finishing Kaigun: Strategy, Tactics, and Technology in the Imperial Japanese Navy, 1887-1941. Good read from the other side. It goes into how Japanese culture, the IJN's experiences in the Russo-Japanese War, their rivalry with the Japanese Army, and budgetary pressures in general shaped their preconceived notions about how they would fight us in the Pacific. And how those notions set them up for failure.

There's a chapter of it on the JPME Strategy and War reading list, but I was enough of a history geek to want to read the whole thing.
 

Griz882

Well-Known Member
pilot
Just finished Lucky 666, a fascinating (and quick) read. The B-17 aircrew ended their historical mission as the single most decorated aircrew in US history (2 x MOH, everyone else got a DSC). Pretty impressive stuff. I found it interesting that Pacific bomber crews flew by the calendar rather than number of missions.
 

Griz882

Well-Known Member
pilot
Not really reading, however, today marks the 50th Anniversary of My Lai massacres. I attended an Army led discussion on the topic in DC (at CSIS). Now that it is all coming back it is astounding to note that of the 28 people implicated in the investigation of charges ranging from murder to rape, only one (LT Calley) was tried. One thing I didn't know si that he was accused of 128 murders, convicted of 22 murders, and these were later lowered to manslaughter. Tragic times and the discussants made it clear this is one of the reasons we have JAGs all the way down to battalion/squadron level.
 
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