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USA Politics Thunderdome

Flash

SEVAL/ECMO
None
Super Moderator
Contributor
In other interesting political news this week;

Th Wall Street Journal reported today that the pornstar Stormy Daniels was paid to keep quiet about her alleged affair with the President last fall. This is in addition to the National Enquirer paying a Playboy Playmate for exclusive rights to her story about an affair with the President last year as well but then never publishing them, the Enquirer's owner happens to be a good friend of the President.

In Missouri Governor Eric Greitens, a former Navy SEAL, confessed to an an affair but denied accusations of blackmail and assault.

Finally, the President cancelled a planned trip to the UK claiming that it was because President Obama made a bad deal for the new US Embassy that is opening soon in London. That and recent Twitter tiffs with the PM and London Mayor almost makes one nostalgic over controversies like whether or not Churchill's bust was removed from the Oval Office.
 

Randy Daytona

Cold War Relic
pilot
Super Moderator
That's not just any Playmate - but the 1988 Playmate of the Year: Karen McDougal.
Slovenia....?

View attachment 17944
Looks pretty bad, just sayin....
Depends on where you look in Slovenia: Lake Bled at the base of the Julian Alps. (A nice trip would be Milan, through Trieste, then Slovenia, finishing in Dubrovnik)





The capital: Llubljana




Off of European travel and back to politics, thought this was a good article by Joel Kotkin in The Daily Beast discussing the difference in the economic industries between Red states and Blue states. https://www.thedailybeast.com/whats-red-blue-and-broke-all-over-america
 

Recovering LSO

Suck Less
pilot
Super Moderator
Contributor
Oh look another article that implies “the bank bailout” did nothing to help the average middle class American.

What I took away from your article is that there are areas clinging to dying economies/industries, and areas that are moving on with changing times. Deep nostalgia for the good old days of coal mining is quaint, but has a shelf life. Ignoring that does nothing to change it.
 

Hotdogs

Leeroy Jenkins
pilot
Oh look another article that implies “the bank bailout” did nothing to help the average middle class American.

What I took away from your article is that there are areas clinging to dying economies/industries, and areas that are moving on with changing times. Deep nostalgia for the good old days of coal mining is quaint, but has a shelf life. Ignoring that does nothing to change it.
This is your opinion based off of what? Coal mining is but one of the industries mentioned in the article. I thought it was decently balanced.
 

Hotdogs

Leeroy Jenkins
pilot
Which part, that the bailout didn't help stabilize the economy for all participants, or the part about decline in coal and manufacturing jobs?
I think you missed the point of the article.

It highlights diverging economies and the politics of playing them against one another. It did say that coal and manufacturing were making a comeback, but hardly a resounding commitment to Coal and manufacturing coming back forever or like it was in the 70s, 80s, and 90s. Your links aren't showing a full picture. Yes, manufacturing has declined since the peak in 1979, and lot's of it has to do with automation, and perception of it might not be realized, but it hardly makes a case for the future. These guys are combining an aging population of baby boomers retiring and normal economic growth, and now you have jobs for a younger generation. Accounting for an estimated 3.4 million jobs, apparently around 2.7 million of them are baby boomer age. They aren't "new jobs," but much like we are seeing today with the mandatory retirements in the airline industry. So yes, manufacturing should continue to play a role in the job market and the US economy in general. Whether that will come true or not remains to be seen.

You can sit there and claim those jobs are never coming back, and that might be true, but the people and the communities of those counties and states will still be there afterwards. That should concern everyone - especially politicians because those states are big swing states in the electoral college. I doubt an entire generation of West Virginians, Ohioans, Iowans, Wisconsinites, and Michiganders will forget being left behind in the midst of an opioid crisis, suffering from declining employment, and being called racist, misogynistic, bigoted rural voters.
 

nittany03

FUBIJAR
pilot
None
Super Moderator
Contributor
Oh look another article that implies “the bank bailout” did nothing to help the average middle class American.

What I took away from your article is that there are areas clinging to dying economies/industries, and areas that are moving on with changing times. Deep nostalgia for the good old days of coal mining is quaint, but has a shelf life. Ignoring that does nothing to change it.
For those of you who have never held a civilian job, you don't "just switch jobs," or "just move." Moving requires finding a home (househunting costs money), buying said home or paying rent (which costs money), and paying movers or U-Haul (which costs money). People who lost their jobs in these "dying industries" may not have the funds to just up and move. Unfortunately, the average American doesn't save as much as they should, but that's a separate story.

Furthermore, once you get to these glorious blooming metropolises, you just don't show up at the door with your resume and get hired. Even in this economy, finding a job is fucking hard sometimes. Especially when you're switching industries. Companies want someone who can hit the ground running; it's hard to find one who will take a leap of faith. As a case in point, as a transitioning officer with a STEM degree, I applied to 81 positions before I signed an offer letter. I probably got callbacks on one out of every 10 of those . . . and those were listings where I thought I could make a reasonable case that I could do the job.

And there's absolutely degree discrimination; I've seen it firsthand. I took a Microsoft tech bootcamp after I MOBed to get a little more current in the industry, and it guaranteed an interview with them. My cohort included a separating Army E-5 who was a sharp dude, but who hadn't finished his degree yet. Interview day came up in Redmond, and he was in the room rocking the interview with some manager or other, who flat-out told him he was saying all the right things, but he still couldn't hire him because he didn't have a bachelor's degree. There's more and more jobs out there where HR requires a degree to do work that probably doesn't need it.

College costs a shit-ton of money. And a lot of people who you claim need to "move on with changing times" may not have that type of coin. So then you're dealing with the student loan issue. TL;DR, if it was that easy to "move on with changing times," people would do it. The private sector is merciless.
 

Brett327

Well-Known Member
None
Super Moderator
Contributor
Got me wondering about the elements of denial and anger as it relates to the stages of the grieving process, and how this framework might apply to those who are tied to the waning coal industry, and more broadly, the throngs of disenfranchised Trump supporters. As interesting as J.D. Vance's book is, it doesn't provide great insights on how we move forward... toward acceptance.
 

robav8r

D-FENS
None
Contributor
For those of you who have never held a civilian job, you don't "just switch jobs," or "just move." Moving requires finding a home (househunting costs money), buying said home or paying rent (which costs money), and paying movers or U-Haul (which costs money). People who lost their jobs in these "dying industries" may not have the funds to just up and move. Unfortunately, the average American doesn't save as much as they should, but that's a separate story.

Furthermore, once you get to these glorious blooming metropolises, you just don't show up at the door with your resume and get hired. Even in this economy, finding a job is fucking hard sometimes. Especially when you're switching industries. Companies want someone who can hit the ground running; it's hard to find one who will take a leap of faith. As a case in point, as a transitioning officer with a STEM degree, I applied to 81 positions before I signed an offer letter. I probably got callbacks on one out of every 10 of those . . . and those were listings where I thought I could make a reasonable case that I could do the job.

And there's absolutely degree discrimination; I've seen it firsthand. I took a Microsoft tech bootcamp after I MOBed to get a little more current in the industry, and it guaranteed an interview with them. My cohort included a separating Army E-5 who was a sharp dude, but who hadn't finished his degree yet. Interview day came up in Redmond, and he was in the room rocking the interview with some manager or other, who flat-out told him he was saying all the right things, but he still couldn't hire him because he didn't have a bachelor's degree. There's more and more jobs out there where HR requires a degree to do work that probably doesn't need it.

College costs a shit-ton of money. And a lot of people who you claim need to "move on with changing times" may not have that type of coin. So then you're dealing with the student loan issue. TL;DR, if it was that easy to "move on with changing times," people would do it. The private sector is merciless.
Some good pearls here. I am in the trenches right now, trying to navigating the "post military" environment and it requires a lot more than a cool LinkedIn profile and a resume that does nothing more than regurgitate your last five years of FITREPs. But hey, enough of that, let's get back to the Trump bashing :cool:
 

Treetop Flyer

Well-Known Member
pilot
Dismissed? It was a long post/story, I chose not to include the whole thing in the reply. Was it the "cool story" part that bothered you? Okie doke, can't help you there.
I wouldn’t say any part bothered me. You responded in a dismissive way, even though it’s a topic on which he obviously has much more experience. You can at least own it. Or try to debate him. Or respond with an internet catch phrase and remind us that you’re still thinking about HAL even when he’s not here.