• Please take a moment and update your account profile. If you have an updated account profile with basic information on why you are on Air Warriors it will help other people respond to your posts. How do you update your profile you ask?

    Go here:

    Edit Account Details and Profile

Private pilot license with military hours?

millalex

New Member
pilot
#62
I know this is an old thread, but I wanted to put this information out there in case anyone else is looking to do some flying in their training downtime.

I had a 5 month break between Primary and Advanced and wanted to do some flying around my hometown while on O-HARP. Per CFR 61.41 military hours can count toward any certificate applied for in part 61:
§ 61.41 Flight training received from flight instructors not certificated by the FAA.
(a) A person may credit flight training toward the requirements of a pilot certificate or rating issued under this part, if that person received the training from:
(1) A flight instructor of an Armed Force in a program for training military pilots of either -
(i) The United States; or
(ii) A foreign contracting State to the Convention on International Civil Aviation.
(2) A flight instructor who is authorized to give such training by the licensing authority of a foreign contracting State to the Convention on International Civil Aviation, and theflight training is given outside the United States.
(b) A flight instructor described in paragraph (a) of this section is only authorized to give endorsements to show training given.
I exchanged emails with an FAA Aviation Safety Inspector at my local Flight Standards District Office and he confirmed that "Your military flight time would count just as any other time you have logged. It is common for people to have their military time in one logbook and start a fresh logbook for civilian time with the military totals carried over."

I then went to my local flying club, met with their chief pilot and explained how I wanted to get checked out for a student solo. We sat down and reviewed my hours and training (from both IFS and Primary) and came up with a plan. I was to do one student solo "check-out" flight, take the Piper Cherokee POH test and the club's SOP test and I would be good to take the plane out by myself.

After reviewing all my flights in IFS and Primary, while combing over the FAR/AIM, I determined that if I wanted to take a check ride for a Private Pilot Certificate I would only need to log 6 additional solo hours, 5 solo CCX hours and do a solo CCX that was >150 miles with 3 legs. The CFI that administered my check out flight confirmed this and agreed that my training was sufficient to meet all criteria.

Obviously this isn't the cheapest way to fly or get a certificate, but it was really fun to apply what I learned in Primary to general aviation (and get to fly without an instructor yelling at my from the backseat). I flew a couple times, had my fun and became a lot more familiar with FAA regulations.
 

picklesuit

Living the GeoBachelor dream...
pilot
Contributor
#63
2500+ hours, I’ve never paid for a single one...
Got my PPL/CPL and Type Rating after advanced, just had to take the test in Corpus...
Then, in 2009, had my wallet stolen in Hawaii on the K-Bay golf course (fuckin’ locals) with my license in it. Still haven’t gone through the trouble to get it replaced...
YMMV, but I find my money was better spent on beer, strippers, and sushi than time in a Piper Cherokee...
 

Gatordev

Well-Known Member
pilot
Site Admin
Contributor
#64
2500+ hours, I’ve never paid for a single one...
Got my PPL/CPL and Type Rating after advanced, just had to take the test in Corpus...
Then, in 2009, had my wallet stolen in Hawaii on the K-Bay golf course (fuckin’ locals) with my license in it. Still haven’t gone through the trouble to get it replaced...
YMMV, but I find my money was better spent on beer, strippers, and sushi than time in a Piper Cherokee...
We all have our past times. Some people like shooting guns, some people like stroking their horses (allegedly, according to the internet). Paying for flight time isn't a sin...and working for that flight time isn't, either. I don't regret washing airplanes every weekend, long before the Navy was a sure thing, just so I could get a 1.0.
 

picklesuit

Living the GeoBachelor dream...
pilot
Contributor
#67
I’m only cheap when it matters...
Now $120 for horseshoes? Sign me up! Yeah, I guess in that light you could be spending money worse ways...
I still have a hard time paying to do something I get paid to do.
@millalex disregard my previous, have fun flying!
Pickle
 

HokiePilot

Well-Known Member
pilot
Contributor
#69
I know this is an old thread, but I wanted to put this information out there in case anyone else is looking to do some flying in their training downtime.

I had a 5 month break between Primary and Advanced and wanted to do some flying around my hometown while on O-HARP. Per CFR 61.41 military hours can count toward any certificate applied for in part 61:


I exchanged emails with an FAA Aviation Safety Inspector at my local Flight Standards District Office and he confirmed that "Your military flight time would count just as any other time you have logged. It is common for people to have their military time in one logbook and start a fresh logbook for civilian time with the military totals carried over."

I then went to my local flying club, met with their chief pilot and explained how I wanted to get checked out for a student solo. We sat down and reviewed my hours and training (from both IFS and Primary) and came up with a plan. I was to do one student solo "check-out" flight, take the Piper Cherokee POH test and the club's SOP test and I would be good to take the plane out by myself.

After reviewing all my flights in IFS and Primary, while combing over the FAR/AIM, I determined that if I wanted to take a check ride for a Private Pilot Certificate I would only need to log 6 additional solo hours, 5 solo CCX hours and do a solo CCX that was >150 miles with 3 legs. The CFI that administered my check out flight confirmed this and agreed that my training was sufficient to meet all criteria.

Obviously this isn't the cheapest way to fly or get a certificate, but it was really fun to apply what I learned in Primary to general aviation (and get to fly without an instructor yelling at my from the backseat). I flew a couple times, had my fun and became a lot more familiar with FAA regulations.
Bro, Nice job looking up the actual regs. That will suit you well. There is nothing wrong with enjoying flying. Keep having fun and good luck in advanced.
 

Griz882

Well-Known Member
pilot
#72
Ah, the Arrow. Where you're never quite sure you're trimmed up because even when trimmed, it just wallows along.
"Wallows"...the only time I could get close to 150kts out of my bird would be the final seconds of the wingless terminal dive we would be in. I have come to really enjoy low, slow, sunny day flights.
 
Top