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New NAMI Color Vision Rules

#1
Hello all!

I thought I would go ahead and create a new thread for those unfortunate few who struggle with those dreaded PIP Plates. Back in the day, the FALANT was an authorized alternative for candidates who failed the PIP.

Most updated version of the NAMI Waiver Guide below


All color vision tests will be administered as delineated in the NAMI Aeromedical Reference and Waiver Guide, Chapter 12.2. The Farnsworth Lantern (FALANT) was discontinued 31 Dec 2016. The FALANT or Optec 900 may be considered for selective aviators who were designated before 31 December 2016. Passing scores: 9/9 correct on the first trial or, if any are missed, at least 16/18 correct on the combined score of the second and third trials.)

Current Color Vision Tests from NAMI

Color Vision: Must pass any one of the following two tests:

1. PIP color plates (Any red-green screening test with at least 14 diagnostic plates; see manufacturer instructions for scoring information) randomly administered under Macbeth lamp: scoring plates 2-15, at least 12/14 correct.

2. Computer-Based Color Vision Testing: must achieve a passing grade on an approved and validated Computer-Based Color Vision Test.

Specifics regarding the Computer-Based Vision Test


Computerized Tests (validated and approved):

a. ColorDX (Waggoner): A score of “normal” or “mild” color vision deficiency in red, green or blue is acceptable for aviation. Tested binocularly (both eyes open). May test monocularly for isolating and tracking acquired color vision defects.

b. Colour Assessment & Diagnosis (CAD, City University London): A score of less than or equal to 6 CAD units for all three cone types in each eye. Tested binocularly (both eyes at the same time).

c. Cone Contrast Test (CCT, Rabin): A score of 55 or greater in each eye is required for all three cone types. This test is given monocularly (one eye at a time).

d. Computer tests shall be administered per manufacturer recommendations with regard to distance, lighting, screen calibration, and monocular or binocular testing. Best correction worn. Computerized tests must be utilized per manufacturer’s instructions; such as administration processes and calibration, room lighting, and screen brightness. Computer-printout grade sheets should be submitted with the physical exam, to ensure objectivity and correctness.
 
#2
Does anyone know how to interpret the following statement from NAMI?

Computerized Tests (validated and approved): a. ColorDX (Waggoner): A score of “normal” or “mild” color vision deficiency in red, green or blue is acceptable for aviation. Tested binocularly (both eyes open). May test monocularly for isolating and tracking acquired color vision defects.
 

Swanee

Self aware since 2014
pilot
Contributor
#3
An optometrist would....

Most if not all of the folks around here have this experience with optometry: Read this line; what number do you see?, which circle is closer? Try not to blink when the puff of air hits your eyeball; see you next year.
 

RUFiO181

Making Recruiting Great Again
#4
Does anyone know how to interpret the following statement from NAMI?

Computerized Tests (validated and approved): a. ColorDX (Waggoner): A score of “normal” or “mild” color vision deficiency in red, green or blue is acceptable for aviation. Tested binocularly (both eyes open). May test monocularly for isolating and tracking acquired color vision defects.
Pass the rest, don't worry about it. If you have questions, just ask the eye doc when you get the test done.

No need to keep asking the same question around here.
 

LFCFan

*Insert nerd wings here*
#5
Does anyone know how to interpret the following statement from NAMI?

Computerized Tests (validated and approved): a. ColorDX (Waggoner): A score of “normal” or “mild” color vision deficiency in red, green or blue is acceptable for aviation. Tested binocularly (both eyes open). May test monocularly for isolating and tracking acquired color vision defects.
You have three different kinds of cone cells in your eyes, each type is optimized to detect red, green, or blue. Colorblindness** is more common in men than women, and is caused by the absence of a cone type, although a lot of people might just be deficient against a certain color vice losing a cone type completely (I'm weaker against green and struggle with pale green vs amber that you sometimes see on electronics - but that is it). So using this test, you're allowed to have mild levels of color deficiency and still be ok to fly.

The FALANT was only good for picking up people who were full blown color blind. If you can't pass that, Santa Claus is green to you or the grass is orange. I can see why the Navy doesn't want to use it anymore. I think they are trying to catch people who are pretty bad but could still pass the super easy test.

**Colorblindness is not "seeing in black and white" - that's called Rod Monochromatism. It's way worse, as you have no cones, just rods (which detect light intensity). So the world is pretty blurry, as cones provide detail. It isn't a sharp black and white photographic world.
 

nittany03

FUBIJAR
pilot
None
Super Moderator
Contributor
#6
An optometrist would....

Most if not all of the folks around here have this experience with optometry: Read this line; what number do you see?, which circle is closer? Try not to blink when the puff of air hits your eyeball; see you next year.
EFF that thing! Seems like I can't not screw it up . . .