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DOR Outcome Question

Ken_gone_flying

"I live vicariously through myself."
pilot
Contributor
#16
Here's what I can tell you. You won't have to worry about having to puke your way through a job you aren't crazy about. You won't make it through primary flight training if you are unable to get over air sickness. Over my 3 years instructing primary, I saw a lot of airsick students. Most get over it, some take longer than others. The ones who don't get over it are attrited. Your chances of redesignation because of attrition due to a circumstance outside of your control are a lot better than if you DOR. My advice to you would be to stick with it. You've been given the opportunity of a lifetime. If you get over your airsickness, you'll probably start to enjoy flying. If you don't, you'll be in a better position to stay in the navy in some capacity. Good luck.
 
#17
If you recieved a NROTC scholorship there is a high probability they will let you re-designate. All the academy and NROTC kids I know that didn't make it through flight school got re-designate. If they Navy paid for your school, they want theirs money's worth out of you. Now, if you were OCS then probably not. Very few OCS DOR/attrites get to stay in the Navy.
Holy S-balls. OP, if you take anything away from this thread, please don't listen to that post above. The kid's signature line should tell you all you need to know.

With that being said, you should think long and hard before pulling the trigger on a DOR. Make sure you research what you'd potentially want to do outside of the aviation community, and have those ideas ready to present and talk to when faced with a Re-Des board/TRB.

The old adage of "they wanna get their money's worth" is the oldest wives' tale out there dude. When I went through API, we were at such a surplus of aviators that they were offering straight tickets to resignation of commission to pretty much anyone who wanted it; that included ROTC and Academy grads. Don't take anything for granted.

Think of any administrative boards or inquiries as job interviews from this point forward. What are your strengths? Weaknesses? What is it that you want to do in the Navy, and why should the Navy retain you to do said job.

Best of luck!
 
#18
Holy S-balls. OP, if you take anything away from this thread, please don't listen to that post above. The kid's signature line should tell you all you need to know.

Best of luck!
I did not mean to spread rumors or bad gouge on this website. I will request that my post be deleted. With regards to my signature. My intentions were to make it easy for new guys to see how long the process has taken me though i know it is different for everyone. Sorry that you view it differently.
 
#19
I did not mean to spread rumors or bad gouge on this website. I will request that my post be deleted. With regards to my signature. My intentions were to make it easy for new guys to see how long the process has taken me though i know it is different for everyone. Sorry that you view it differently.
Yeah, I'd probably keep that info handy, but dole it out via PM. Otherwise, you look like "that guy," and by "that guy," I mean the "lead Ensign email" type. (old folks will get it ;))
 
#20
When I went through API, we were at such a surplus of aviators that they were offering straight tickets to resignation of commission to pretty much anyone who wanted it; that included ROTC and Academy grads.
How did they go about doing this? Was there an announcement or did they present it as a brief? Did they pull random people into a classroom?
 
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