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Degree Completion Plan Instructions

sevenhelmet

Did I miss a step?
pilot
#19
That's unfortunate.
Yeah, it is. Clearly there's more to the story, since I seriously doubt he'd quit the forum over some mild heckling.

Regarding the "degree completion plan", is this something that every USN recruit going to a civilian college now has to do? I'd never heard of it outside of this forum.
 

NavyOffRec

Well-Known Member
#20
Yeah, it is. Clearly there's more to the story, since I seriously doubt he'd quit the forum over some mild heckling.

Regarding the "degree completion plan", is this something that every USN recruit going to a civilian college now has to do? I'd never heard of it outside of this forum.
It has been in process for a very long time, every civilian currently applying that is still going to college needs to do one.
 

sevenhelmet

Did I miss a step?
pilot
#21
It has been in process for a very long time, every civilian currently applying that is still going to college needs to do one.
I honestly find the concept a little insulting toward the students. To me, it smacks of "You screwed up, now you have to show us your get-well plan". For part-time students or those in majors with a lot of schedule/class leeway, I can maybe see it. The Navy obviously wants to know when these guys will be available for commission. But aren't students in a full-time, accredited curriculum on a set syllabus? Maybe I'm not looking at this the right way, but can we really not trust someone who is enrolled in a curriculum to get their degree in a set period of time?
 

Jim123

molding (warping) the future of naval aviation
pilot
#22
I honestly find the concept a little insulting toward the students- aren't the majority of people in a full-time, accredited curriculum on a set 4 or 5 year syllabus? Maybe I'm not looking at this the right way, but can we really not trust someone who is going to college to get their degree in a set period of time?
Maybe your circle of friends back in college didn't have a lot of slackers in it, but they're out there... that and it sounds like it's how you format your explanation if you're on the "4-and-a-bit years" version of a 4 year syllabus (there are lots of us out there too).
 

sevenhelmet

Did I miss a step?
pilot
#23
Maybe your circle of friends back in college didn't have a lot of slackers in it, but they're out there... that and it sounds like it's how you format your explanation if you're on the "4-and-a-bit years" version of a 4 year syllabus (there are lots of us out there too).
I can see that, I suppose, although >4 years doesn't mean someone is a slacker. This also seems as though it could easily be left as a self-critiquing evolution, e.g. "You tell me when you're going to graduate, then go make it happen- the minutiae is your problem, but I'm here to help if you need it". I guess if enough people screwed that up, it could result in something like this as a reactive measure- which is sort of the unwritten "feel" of this requirement anyway (my opinion).

I went to military college, so not graduating in a set period of time wasn't really a viable option. I never had to show my accessions officer a "plan" beyond him knowing my major and me passing my classes (which was difficult enough at times). As expensive as college can be, it actually amazes me how long some people choose to draw it out.
 
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#24
I honestly find the concept a little insulting toward the students. To me, it smacks of "You screwed up, now you have to show us your get-well plan". For part-time students or those in majors with a lot of schedule/class leeway, I can maybe see it. The Navy obviously wants to know when these guys will be available for commission. But aren't students in a full-time, accredited curriculum on a set syllabus? Maybe I'm not looking at this the right way, but can we really not trust someone who is enrolled in a curriculum to get their degree in a set period of time?
I think you might be looking at it wrong. To be eligible for a commission, you need a college degree. If you are applying without one, you need to show that you have a plan to obtain one within a certain timeframe (I believe it's 12 months from the board date). Its not a you messed up, now show us how you will correct it, its essentially a substitute or a placeholder for a degree, and saying you will obtain it by a certain date and this is your plan.
 

Skywalker

Officer Candidate Hopeful
#25
Where I've run into trouble, personally, is that I did my first two years as a poli sci major, then switched to physics, found out I had bit off more than I could chew, and downgraded the physics track to just a mathematics track. Even after easing off the throttle, I've still been trying to fit the last few years of the usual math syllabus into a summer + a regular school year. I might just pull it off, but it's exacting a heavy toll on every other area of my life.
 

ea6bflyr

Working Class Bum
None
Super Moderator
Contributor
#26
Yeah, it is. Clearly there's more to the story, since I seriously doubt he'd quit the forum over some mild heckling.

Regarding the "degree completion plan", is this something that every USN recruit going to a civilian college now has to do? I'd never heard of it outside of this forum.
NROTC student are required to file a Degree Completion Plan. It helps the student and advisor keep track of their progress to ensure they graduate on time and within the bounds of their commissioning program (NROTC, STA21, etc)
 

sevenhelmet

Did I miss a step?
pilot
#27
I think you might be looking at it wrong. To be eligible for a commission, you need a college degree. If you are applying without one, you need to show that you have a plan to obtain one within a certain timeframe (I believe it's 12 months from the board date). Its not a you messed up, now show us how you will correct it, its essentially a substitute or a placeholder for a degree, and saying you will obtain it by a certain date and this is your plan.
OK, makes sense enough.
 

RUFiO181

Making Recruiting Great Again
#29
The DCP is just documentation showing that the applicant is on track to graduate when. Not meant to be punitive. Additionally, it shows the applicant is "hopefully" taking full time classes in order to graduate in time (except the final semester in which the applicant might only need 8-10 credits to graduate).