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DCOIC Gouge for those about to commission as a DCO

Chance_EDO

Still a Pollywog, not yet a Shellback
Dude, did you not read his post. Talk to an OR, these are all questions that can be easily answered.
Okay I will do that. When I asked my recruiter before, I was told my commitment was basically 1x a month for drilling. I’m guessing it is 16 hours total. I will ask again.
 

Sculpin

Ballast Point's #1 customer
Something to pad your civilian resume?
Do people actually do this? What's your guys' experience with this when looking for a new job? I feel the last thing I'd want to tell a potential future employer in interviews is "I have to leave for at least 2 weeks a year for military LOA, or even 6-12 months if mobilized". I know about USERRA, but what are you going to do when they tell you they picked a better candidate when privately they just don't like your Navy gig?

Just as women (and men, because paternity leave is a thing and I have known men taking 2-3 months off per baby and women taking 6-12 months off) don't go telling interviewers if they're planning to have a baby in the next few years, I don't feel a need to do so either, especially with regards to employers who don't respect military service.
 
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Chance_EDO

Still a Pollywog, not yet a Shellback
Hi Sculpin
I agree with you. We serve for our sense of duty and to serve our country. Many politicians serve in the Reserves for honor and duty too, not to pad their resume.

Joe Biden’s son, Hunter Biden serves in the Navy Reserves as a PAO Officer. His other son Beau serves in the National Guard. We all serve for our sense of duty.

“In May 2013, Biden was selected as a direct commission officer in the U.S. Naval Reserve.

Because Biden was past the cut-off age for the program, he needed a waiver. Biden received a second waiver because of a past drug-related incident.”
 
Its not about leaving - its about the security clearance, "the club", and the direct or indirect leadership/management experience or perceived experience comes with saying your are/were a Military Officer.

Some do it to pad their resume - does not mean all do. I would also say that this is not a good argument to have here on AW because everyone here cares enough to continue to help others and build a sense of community. So.... pretty much no actual sailors here would be the "pad the stats" type. But they do exist and most likely get out with their experience/clearance as soon as they can. That doesn't change that they still may or may not have served with honor and duty for the time they did serve.
 
Okay I will do that. When I asked my recruiter before, I was told my commitment was basically 1x a month for drilling. I’m guessing it is 16 hours total. I will ask again.
your issue is that IP was an after thought for you and you where not or did not do your own research as diligently as you would have. Also, the training requirement as slowly increased - and may increase some more. I was also told by my community interviewers etc. that there is work to be done outside of DWE for a commanders call/etc. once you get infused into the unit (ie. not in training assignment)
 

Flash

SEVAL/ECMO
None
Super Moderator
Contributor
...When I asked my recruiter before, I was told my commitment was basically 1x a month for drilling. I’m guessing it is 16 hours total. I will ask again.
You're right about the 16 hours for a drill weekend but you will likely do more than that with emails, calls and paperwork outside a drill weekend that will take up more time, and you also have at least 2 weeks a year playing Navy full time. My commands have all been reasonable with work/life/reserve balance but even then I am usually having to do things 2 to 3 times a week for the reserves, from 5 mins to an hour or two.

If you are like Edison or Napoleon then you can squeeze the reserves in between your 80+ hours of work, 15-20 hours of working out and your masters degree, if you are normal though you might have a hard time keeping up with everything.
 

Chance_EDO

Still a Pollywog, not yet a Shellback
Hello Flash

Thank you so much for being so nice to explain the commitments and time required that extends beyond the 1x weekend a month.
It is very insightful and appreciated!

I agree that this forum and it’s members are a community and we help each other with advice.

Due to the advice on here, I decided to get a very technical STEM graduate degree (electrical engineering or computer engineering) to help my application. However, the board selected me without me getting one. So, I will probably not pursue one. There just isn’t enough time in a day.

I’ll focus on working out 10x a week for fitness. Trying to lose weight and get in shape asap for the PT test and swim......😊
 
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Sculpin

Ballast Point's #1 customer
Its not about leaving - its about the security clearance, "the club", and the direct or indirect leadership/management experience or perceived experience comes with saying your are/were a Military Officer.

Some do it to pad their resume - does not mean all do. I would also say that this is not a good argument to have here on AW because everyone here cares enough to continue to help others and build a sense of community. So.... pretty much no actual sailors here would be the "pad the stats" type. But they do exist and most likely get out with their experience/clearance as soon as they can. That doesn't change that they still may or may not have served with honor and duty for the time they did serve.
I wouldn't even bother. The corporate world, for example, would ideally have drones whose lives are nothing but work. Many corporations have policies against work outside of work unless it gets approved by some VP/executive level person, in large part because they want employees to focus solely on that job (vague "conflict of interest" rules and other things are also concerns). In this world, I can't think of a single good reason to mention military status (except perhaps at defense contractors) to interviewers, but several that would damn my chances.

For kicks, I decided to respond to one of the tech recruiters that spam my LinkedIn yesterday. After a brief back and forth, I mentioned the DWEs and AT (not even MOBs), and got ghosted, as expected. Regardless, your mileage may vary. Maybe some recruiters/interviews won't care or may even see it positively, but others will despise you for it, particularly in my industry. Best to play it on the safe side in my opinion. I don't feel it's worth discussing things in interviews that aren't specific to explaining why you'd be an amazing employee. Casually mentioning there may/will be extended periods of time to go to the other side of the world, among other things, will leave a bad taste in people's mouths and cause confusion and suspicion, which is never good in an interview.
 
Okay I will do that. When I asked my recruiter before, I was told my commitment was basically 1x a month for drilling. I’m guessing it is 16 hours total. I will ask again.
No idea what designator you're going for, but I would skip Cargo Handling units if I were you.
 
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Do people actually do this? What's your guys' experience with this when looking for a new job? I feel the last thing I'd want to tell a potential future employer in interviews is "I have to leave for at least 2 weeks a year for military LOA, or even 6-12 months if mobilized". I know about USERRA, but what are you going to do when they tell you they picked a better candidate when privately they just don't like your Navy gig?

Just as women (and men, because paternity leave is a thing and I have known men taking 2-3 months off per baby and women taking 6-12 months off) don't go telling interviewers if they're planning to have a baby in the next few years, I don't feel a need to do so either, especially with regards to employers who don't respect military service.
Most, if not all, Fortune 200/500 companies track employee statistics like military service. They use certain statistics as recruiting bullet points when seeking new employees and also to show how military friendly they are. Many of these same companies also provide additional benefits for employees who serve in the Guard/Reserves. For example, I work for a Fortune 200 company and I get x number of days per year for military duty (covers my Friday drills and AT). Additionally, if I were to deploy/mobilize (high likelihood in the next 24-36 months) they will pay me the difference between my salary and base military pay (trust me I'm not serving for the pay). I realize not all companies do this, but I'd say a large majority of those on the Fortune 200/500 do.
 
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