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Can a permanent disqualification be reversed with proper documents?

#1
Quick back story, I'm looking to join the Navy as a supply officer. I called a recruiter looking for info and I guess he was doing pre-screening questions because he asked if I had asthma .. now I know some will say to lie, but I had a military friend tell me that they give waivers for asthma, but failed to tell me that this only is for people who haven't had it after their 13th birthday.
A little about me, I played basketball in college and professionally for a few years (last time I played was early 2017). Ive never had an asthma attack within those years, I just always tell doctors I have asthma just because I know I've had it as a kid and maybe a little chest tightness in high school (which would've been after my 13th birthday which is why I said yes to the recruiter) but nothing major after that.

Needless to say, the recruiter said he'd have to PDQ me. I feel like something that didn't affect me as a collegiate/pro athlete shouldn't hinder me as an officer. So I took it upon myself to get a methacholine test done just to see if I still had asthma. Still awaiting the test results, but my question is if the test come back negative can the PDQ be reversed since I have it writing that I no longer have asthma? Also since it was just a phone call am I still in the "Navy database" (idk what else to call it) as being PDQ or is your information not even saved if you don't pass the pre screening?
 

RUFiO181

Making Recruiting Great Again
#2
Asthma waivers are being granted up to 18 years old now. You will need 5 years of medical records (for any reason), your asthma documents including RX records, and a favorable PFT showing your airways are GTG.
 
#3
Asthma waivers are being granted up to 18 years old now. You will need 5 years of medical records (for any reason), your asthma documents including RX records, and a favorable PFT showing your airways are GTG.
Okay that is good to know. Maybe I should go to a different recruiter because the one I spoke to didn't say any of that. This happened back in September so unless something changed after we spoke..
 

RUFiO181

Making Recruiting Great Again
#4
Okay that is good to know. Maybe I should go to a different recruiter because the one I spoke to didn't say any of that. This happened back in September so unless something changed after we spoke..
This was put out to the field maybe the Spring? It's been more than a hot minute.
 

RedFive

Well-Known Member
pilot
Contributor
#7
Officer recruiters are few and far between compared to enlisted, so it may not be so simple as going to another one -- but you should certainly try! I'm no expert, but my anecdotal evidence with my officer recruiter in Phoenix was that he was overworked and trying to cover all of Arizona and some (all?) of New Mexico at the time. Other people on here will have better gouge for you on the best way to proceed, but this really doesn't sound like a show-stopper. Don't give up and listen to the guys here on the best way forward. Goodluck!
 
#8
update: finally got the call back from my doctor, my PFT came back normal so asthma is no longer an issue and he said he's willing to draft a letter for me saying I'm good to go since he knows I'm trying to join.

My question now is when I talk to the recruiter should I tell them I don't have asthma since it's confirmed that I don't, or should I let them know about the test and the results? Asking because from looking through random threads in on this site I see that all officers have to get a security clearance and I didn't know if they check civilian med records which would show that I've had an inhaler before.
 
#9
update: finally got the call back from my doctor, my PFT came back normal so asthma is no longer an issue and he said he's willing to draft a letter for me saying I'm good to go since he knows I'm trying to join.

My question now is when I talk to the recruiter should I tell them I don't have asthma since it's confirmed that I don't, or should I let them know about the test and the results? Asking because from looking through random threads in on this site I see that all officers have to get a security clearance and I didn't know if they check civilian med records which would show that I've had an inhaler before.
The question on the medical form will be something like "do you have or have you ever been diagnosed with......."
 

RedFive

Well-Known Member
pilot
Contributor
#10
Asking because from looking through random threads in on this site I see that all officers have to get a security clearance and I didn't know if they check civilian med records which would show that I've had an inhaler before.
I really don't think they check medical history for your security clearance -- at least I don't recall submitting anything regarding that. That's not their area of concern, they leave that to the medical side of the DOD to determine if you're fit. Anyone else experience it differently?

I had a girlfriend in college who got the occasional migraine -- or at least what she thought were migraines. She wanted to be an AF pilot, people told her not to bring it up during her initial medical screening. Well, what did she do? She told the AF she got migraines and was DQ'd from flying. FFS. So then she spent a long time (six months, a year perhaps?) getting cleared, a having a doctor write a letter similar to yours, and she's been flying C-130s ever since. If she can do that, I think you can be a Suppo.

More importantly, are you sure you want to be a Suppo? Have you discussed this with anyone who has been there, done that?
 
#11
I really don't think they check medical history for your security clearance -- at least I don't recall submitting anything regarding that. That's not their area of concern, they leave that to the medical side of the DOD to determine if you're fit. Anyone else experience it differently?

I had a girlfriend in college who got the occasional migraine -- or at least what she thought were migraines. She wanted to be an AF pilot, people told her not to bring it up during her initial medical screening. Well, what did she do? She told the AF she got migraines and was DQ'd from flying. FFS. So then she spent a long time (six months, a year perhaps?) getting cleared, a having a doctor write a letter similar to yours, and she's been flying C-130s ever since. If she can do that, I think you can be a Suppo.

More importantly, are you sure you want to be a Suppo? Have you discussed this with anyone who has been there, done that?
Well I know i don't want to be a pilot (probably not even qualified for it), SWO would be my second option but navigating ships isn't an interest for me but I still would accept that role because being a naval OFFICER is my overall goal. I have my MBA and most of my civilian jobs have some logistic aspects to it so that's why I'm most comfortable with SUPPO. Also I talked to a SUPPO officer who got his specialty in contracting which is exactly what I wanted to do so it kind of felt like fate running into him :rolleyes: those 3 plus Intel are the only paths I'm familiar with honestly. I see SNA up here a lot but not sure what that is .. I believe there is a public affairs pathway as well?
 

RedFive

Well-Known Member
pilot
Contributor
#14
What’s wrong with being a SUPPO?
Absolutely nothing, my SO was a SUPPO for many years. I got a close-up look at what she did and I can say it definitely wasn't for me. She loved leading Sailors and was great at it, but the number crunching, tracking parts, ordering shit, balancing budgets, etc....just not for me. So I just want to make sure he's aware of what he's getting into. Sounds like he is!
 
#15
Absolutely nothing, my SO was a SUPPO for many years. I got a close-up look at what she did and I can say it definitely wasn't for me. She loved leading Sailors and was great at it, but the number crunching, tracking parts, ordering shit, balancing budgets, etc....just not for me. So I just want to make sure he's aware of what he's getting into. Sounds like he is!
She* ;)
But yes for the most part I've done my SUPPO research, still want to gather a full list of the possible officer career paths, think I saw one on a Navy website that I'll have to revisit
 
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