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1,001 questions about the ASTB (post your scores & ask your questions here!)

Someone can correct me if I'm wrong, but if you're in NROTC, your class adviser should just be submitting your entire package around the time your service selection preferences are due to NSTC. That's normally right around the beginning of September with word back around mid-October. So you just submit your service preferences with SNA as #1 and stay in touch with your adviser about dates/information, but once we take the ASTB its just playing the waiting game.
Thanks for this. I guess my impression of submitting my designator request and crossing my fingers was pretty spot on.
 
Took the ASTB about two weeks ago and got a 56 5/5/5.. I studied for 5 hours the day before and that is it. I had no idea what I was walking into.
Didnt know about this website until after I took it unfortunately.
Have been going through a lot of the gouge on here and it is really helping me narrow down what to study for.
Scheduled to take it again September 18th.

On my test:

Math: would've been much easier had a just done a ton of word problems and fraction practice.
Lots of DRT, had the problem where guy donates 1/8th of his 2 1/2 ton crop, how much did he donate question?
had the question where Joe smith drives at 3 different speeds for 3 different amount of time and then asks how far did he go?
Had a few simplifying questions, nothing too crazy. Know your rules like PEMDAS and FOIL, cuz if you do not then you will have no chance to get those questions right.
No matrices or logs.. going to expect them for the second time though.

Reading: Easy, just be careful, some answers could be correct but only 1 is taken directly from the text.

Mechanical:
struggled b/c I didnt really have enough time to brush up on anything and did not really know what to expect.
had questions on levers, pulleys and gears just like everyone else.
had the one Q: if a pulley had a radius of ___ how much rope will it use if it spins ___ times.
They pulled from a lot of different physics concepts, so just study a physics 101 textbook or high school physics, everything I feel would be covered.
I saw Newtons and OHMs law.

Aviation:
I was really bad, did not know much going in.
Now, I am studying the FAA book and also picked up William Kershners Student Pilots Flight Manual and it is really good! especially since I have virtually zero flight experience.
saw question that asked something like what are the 4 forces on a plane when flying or something like that, also a question on what force is not acting on a plane.
Questions on what controls pitch and what controls yawing.
Question on airspeed and groundspeed and how to calculate it.
Question on some instruments plane and what they measure. (sorry cant remember exactly)
Question on what would happen if a small plane landed behind a bigger plane with a bigger engine...something along that line.
It was a lot of basic stuff that I know now. Just studying the FAA handbook wouldve really helped me.

Nautical and Naval History
questions on shirts of Airmen, where do you eat on the ship (what is it called), who broke the sound barrier, forecastle, port and starboard. I got kicked from this pretty early I think. Question on what plane was designed/used to counter the germans silent submarine in WWII...something like that. Who broke the sound barrier, and different classifications for aircraft and what squadrons fly what planes.


The rest was very hard for me, especially UAV and PBM because I had no idea about either of those before going in, sad I heard about this site after.


Looking for some flashcards or materials on aircraft classifications and aircraft history of the Navy, I feel like this is my biggest weakspot that I dont know how to study for.

ALSO, for those of you who took the ASTB TWICE!!! What were the differences you saw in the test from the first time to the second time??
Was the material in math and mechanical much different? For example I did not see any questions about Logs or Matrices on my first attempt and I saw lots of DRT, should I now just expect the opposite?

Thanks for everything/anything!
 

RUFiO181

Making Recruiting Great Again
ALSO, for those of you who took the ASTB TWICE!!! What were the differences you saw in the test from the first time to the second time??
Was the material in math and mechanical much different? For example I did not see any questions about Logs or Matrices on my first attempt and I saw lots of DRT, should I now just expect the opposite?
I think studying more than 5 hours the day before will probably help your chances of getting a good score...
 
Took the ASTB about two weeks ago and got a 56 5/5/5.. I studied for 5 hours the day before and that is it. I had no idea what I was walking into.
Didnt know about this website until after I took it unfortunately.
Have been going through a lot of the gouge on here and it is really helping me narrow down what to study for.
Scheduled to take it again September 18th.

On my test:

Math: would've been much easier had a just done a ton of word problems and fraction practice.
Lots of DRT, had the problem where guy donates 1/8th of his 2 1/2 ton crop, how much did he donate question?
had the question where Joe smith drives at 3 different speeds for 3 different amount of time and then asks how far did he go?
Had a few simplifying questions, nothing too crazy. Know your rules like PEMDAS and FOIL, cuz if you do not then you will have no chance to get those questions right.
No matrices or logs.. going to expect them for the second time though.

Reading: Easy, just be careful, some answers could be correct but only 1 is taken directly from the text.

Mechanical:
struggled b/c I didnt really have enough time to brush up on anything and did not really know what to expect.
had questions on levers, pulleys and gears just like everyone else.
had the one Q: if a pulley had a radius of ___ how much rope will it use if it spins ___ times.
They pulled from a lot of different physics concepts, so just study a physics 101 textbook or high school physics, everything I feel would be covered.
I saw Newtons and OHMs law.

Aviation:
I was really bad, did not know much going in.
Now, I am studying the FAA book and also picked up William Kershners Student Pilots Flight Manual and it is really good! especially since I have virtually zero flight experience.
saw question that asked something like what are the 4 forces on a plane when flying or something like that, also a question on what force is not acting on a plane.
Questions on what controls pitch and what controls yawing.
Question on airspeed and groundspeed and how to calculate it.
Question on some instruments plane and what they measure. (sorry cant remember exactly)
Question on what would happen if a small plane landed behind a bigger plane with a bigger engine...something along that line.
It was a lot of basic stuff that I know now. Just studying the FAA handbook wouldve really helped me.

Nautical and Naval History
questions on shirts of Airmen, where do you eat on the ship (what is it called), who broke the sound barrier, forecastle, port and starboard. I got kicked from this pretty early I think. Question on what plane was designed/used to counter the germans silent submarine in WWII...something like that. Who broke the sound barrier, and different classifications for aircraft and what squadrons fly what planes.


The rest was very hard for me, especially UAV and PBM because I had no idea about either of those before going in, sad I heard about this site after.


Looking for some flashcards or materials on aircraft classifications and aircraft history of the Navy, I feel like this is my biggest weakspot that I dont know how to study for.

ALSO, for those of you who took the ASTB TWICE!!! What were the differences you saw in the test from the first time to the second time??
Was the material in math and mechanical much different? For example I did not see any questions about Logs or Matrices on my first attempt and I saw lots of DRT, should I now just expect the opposite?

Thanks for everything/anything!
Hey, give my post on this forum a look (just get to it from my profile) and you'll find a link to a Google drive with great flashcard links and other study material for both the UAV and Nautical/Navy history and information. I took the test twice and I found the math to be quite similar, I had less DRT both times than it seems you did though. Mechanical was pretty similar as well, you can see what I wrote up in my post. DEFINITELY practice the UAV flashcards that are in there, they helped me a ton. Good luck!
 

peppergunner

ɹǝqɯǝW pǝʇɹǝʌuI
ALSO, for those of you who took the ASTB TWICE!!! What were the differences you saw in the test from the first time to the second time??
Was the material in math and mechanical much different? For example I did not see any questions about Logs or Matrices on my first attempt and I saw lots of DRT, should I now just expect the opposite?

Thanks for everything/anything!
Check my signature for some good study tips I've tried to gather from this thread.

It doesn't matter that you studied for 5 hours a day because you didn't mention how many total days you studied. If you did that for a few days ahead of time, that's only 20 hours of studying. If you did that for a few weeks and actually studied a lot, then you had issues with the material you studied, which this forum should help you with since all the resources are available to you.


Also, about the "questions you will see", the test is adaptive and gets harder if you get more questions right. You didn't see logs or matrices because you didn't get the questions right before then. So next time if you see logs and whatnot, it means you've done better.
 
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Took my first (and last) attempt this morning and ended up with a 65 9/9/9.

I don't know how much I'll be able to add to the gouge, but I figured I would share my test experiences at the very least.

MST
I got a ton (4-5) questions on probability, which was certainly more than I expected. Most of it was pretty straightforwards, but there was a bit involving the probability of multiple events and multiplying probabilities of disjoint and non disjoint events.
I also got questions about binary and how to write a certain number in a base 2 or base 4 code, I hadn't had any prior exposure to binary but was able to reason it out through the information given in the question, but I'd say the majority of my questions were word problems involving some sort of related rates or intersecting times, generally involving using d=rt.
In general, the MST was much more difficult than I anticipated, math has never been my strongest area, and I found the questions more difficult than those in Barron's book as well as the Marine gouge posted on this site.
I finished 12-15 questions and was kicked out with around 16 minutes remaining.

RCT
I found the passages pretty difficult and confusing at a first glance, but was able to answer most questions using a process of elimination. Remember to answer based off of what is given and don't draw on any outside information. Most of the passages were Navy related (dry), nothing super exciting.

MCT
About as expected based off of Barron's book and the gouge, almost all questions were purely conceptual, any math was straightforwards and simple. However, there were some strange questions involving how microwave ovens work, what G's are defined as, how pitots work, and a couple of pulley questions.

ANIT
As expected, but I studied a lot for this section. Difficult questions (for me) involved the Naval Air Forces chain of command, VFR regulations, and how different grades of aircraft fuel affect engine performance.

NAFTI
Today I learned that I'm a terrible person.

PBM
Hard.
I used the compass trick for the UAV, missed 2 and averaged 1-1.5 seconds. The dichotic listening was easy by itself, but the aircraft tracking was difficult, I felt like I was tracking <10% of the time and my joystick came unplugged at one point during the test, but I guess it worked out.
Write down the emergency procedures!

All in all, I studied around 8 weeks for the test, averaging 10 hours per week. As far as books go, I used Barron's 4th edition which I found useful, along with NAVEDTRA 14014 and the FAA Pilot's handbook for the ANIT, but the most useful study materials in my opinion are the various gouges posted in this thread, (Marine gouge, apatrick's guide, ect.) for which I can't thank you all enough.

Good luck to all future test takers, and feel free to send me a PM with any questions or if you'd like my full list of study materials.
 
Took my first (and last) attempt this morning and ended up with a 65 9/9/9.

I don't know how much I'll be able to add to the gouge, but I figured I would share my test experiences at the very least.

MST
I got a ton (4-5) questions on probability, which was certainly more than I expected. Most of it was pretty straightforwards, but there was a bit involving the probability of multiple events and multiplying probabilities of disjoint and non disjoint events.
I also got questions about binary and how to write a certain number in a base 2 or base 4 code, I hadn't had any prior exposure to binary but was able to reason it out through the information given in the question, but I'd say the majority of my questions were word problems involving some sort of related rates or intersecting times, generally involving using d=rt.
In general, the MST was much more difficult than I anticipated, math has never been my strongest area, and I found the questions more difficult than those in Barron's book as well as the Marine gouge posted on this site.
I finished 12-15 questions and was kicked out with around 16 minutes remaining.

RCT
I found the passages pretty difficult and confusing at a first glance, but was able to answer most questions using a process of elimination. Remember to answer based off of what is given and don't draw on any outside information. Most of the passages were Navy related (dry), nothing super exciting.

MCT
About as expected based off of Barron's book and the gouge, almost all questions were purely conceptual, any math was straightforwards and simple. However, there were some strange questions involving how microwave ovens work, what G's are defined as, how pitots work, and a couple of pulley questions.

ANIT
As expected, but I studied a lot for this section. Difficult questions (for me) involved the Naval Air Forces chain of command, VFR regulations, and how different grades of aircraft fuel affect engine performance.

NAFTI
Today I learned that I'm a terrible person.

PBM
Hard.
I used the compass trick for the UAV, missed 2 and averaged 1-1.5 seconds. The dichotic listening was easy by itself, but the aircraft tracking was difficult, I felt like I was tracking <10% of the time and my joystick came unplugged at one point during the test, but I guess it worked out.
Write down the emergency procedures!

All in all, I studied around 8 weeks for the test, averaging 10 hours per week. As far as books go, I used Barron's 4th edition which I found useful, along with NAVEDTRA 14014 and the FAA Pilot's handbook for the ANIT, but the most useful study materials in my opinion are the various gouges posted in this thread, (Marine gouge, apatrick's guide, ect.) for which I can't thank you all enough.

Good luck to all future test takers, and feel free to send me a PM with any questions or if you'd like my full list of study materials.
I think it is safe to say that you did good *vomits*
 
Took my first (and last) attempt this morning and ended up with a 65 9/9/9.

I don't know how much I'll be able to add to the gouge, but I figured I would share my test experiences at the very least.

MST
I got a ton (4-5) questions on probability, which was certainly more than I expected. Most of it was pretty straightforwards, but there was a bit involving the probability of multiple events and multiplying probabilities of disjoint and non disjoint events.
I also got questions about binary and how to write a certain number in a base 2 or base 4 code, I hadn't had any prior exposure to binary but was able to reason it out through the information given in the question, but I'd say the majority of my questions were word problems involving some sort of related rates or intersecting times, generally involving using d=rt.
In general, the MST was much more difficult than I anticipated, math has never been my strongest area, and I found the questions more difficult than those in Barron's book as well as the Marine gouge posted on this site.
I finished 12-15 questions and was kicked out with around 16 minutes remaining.

RCT
I found the passages pretty difficult and confusing at a first glance, but was able to answer most questions using a process of elimination. Remember to answer based off of what is given and don't draw on any outside information. Most of the passages were Navy related (dry), nothing super exciting.

MCT
About as expected based off of Barron's book and the gouge, almost all questions were purely conceptual, any math was straightforwards and simple. However, there were some strange questions involving how microwave ovens work, what G's are defined as, how pitots work, and a couple of pulley questions.

ANIT
As expected, but I studied a lot for this section. Difficult questions (for me) involved the Naval Air Forces chain of command, VFR regulations, and how different grades of aircraft fuel affect engine performance.

NAFTI
Today I learned that I'm a terrible person.

PBM
Hard.
I used the compass trick for the UAV, missed 2 and averaged 1-1.5 seconds. The dichotic listening was easy by itself, but the aircraft tracking was difficult, I felt like I was tracking <10% of the time and my joystick came unplugged at one point during the test, but I guess it worked out.
Write down the emergency procedures!

All in all, I studied around 8 weeks for the test, averaging 10 hours per week. As far as books go, I used Barron's 4th edition which I found useful, along with NAVEDTRA 14014 and the FAA Pilot's handbook for the ANIT, but the most useful study materials in my opinion are the various gouges posted in this thread, (Marine gouge, apatrick's guide, ect.) for which I can't thank you all enough.

Good luck to all future test takers, and feel free to send me a PM with any questions or if you'd like my full list of study materials.
Great scores! Your hard work paid off. I have a question: were there many helo questions in the ANIT section?

I ask because one study book I have, has lots of helo questions but most other study material doesnt have any.
 
Great scores! Your hard work paid off. I have a question: were there many helo questions in the ANIT section?

I ask because one study book I have, has lots of helo questions but most other study material doesnt have any.
YMMV. I don't think I had a single helo question on mine, but I also don't think I had anything on VFR or aircraft fuel either. Seems like they have a massive bank of questions they pull from, so study broadly for this section.
 
Just took the ASTB-E today (3rd time so the pressure was on), got a 53 6/7/7, so I'm pretty stoked! I was mainly worried about the PFAR and based on what I know now I have a few tips for it.

1.) Get a flight sim and a joystick and throttle. Even though the test is on a flat plain, using a throttle develops muscle memory and it's not so foreign when you get to that portion of the test. I would also agree with others posting about using a video game with the y-axis inverted. I didn't do that but it definitely seems like it would've helped.
2.) When you have to do multiple things, such as using the throttle and joystick and then when it adds the dichotic listening and emergency procedures, focus on the listening and throttle and try to at least move the joystick around. The throttle is much easier to keep on track than the joystick. Obviously try to keep both on track if you can.
3.) When you first start with the listening, try to get every single one right, it'll get you major points. I only missed one or two.
4.) Finally, when using the joystick to follow around the target, don't be too fast and be kind of smooth. For example, if the plane is going from corner to corner and you jerk the stick around it's gonna fly past it, be as smooth as possible so that it'll at least go over it slowly or stay with the target.

Got some great resources on here so thanks to everyone that posted!
 
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