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“AIRRAID ON PEARL HARBOR X THIS IS NO DRILL.”

Randy Daytona

Cold War Relic
pilot
Super Moderator
#1
75 Years ago today. For those of you still on the line, always be ready. And for all of us, a moment to pause and remember those who came before us.

https://www.washingtonpost.com/news...or-x-this-is-no-drill/?utm_term=.19597feea690



Smoke and flames rise from the USS Arizona during the Dec. 7, 1941, Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor. (U.S. Navy/AP file)





The only battleship to get underway, USS Nevada (BB-36). It was moored aft of USS Arizona. The Nevada, struck by at least 1 torpedo and 5 bombs, had the good fortune to have been changing out ammunition that weekend and thus empty magazines.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/USS_Nevada_(BB-36)



Battleship Row. The Dec 7th weekend was the first time since the July 4th weekend that all battleships were in port at the same time (according to Wikipedia)
 

Randy Daytona

Cold War Relic
pilot
Super Moderator
#3
Update:
Navy admiral burns Colin Kaepernick in Pearl Harbor speech

(CNN)In a speech commemorating the 75th Anniversary of Pearl Harbor, U.S. Pacific Command Commander Admiral Harry Harris decided to slip in an apparent jab at noted national anthem protester Colin Kaepernick.

"You can bet that the men and women we honor today, and those who died that fateful morning 75 years ago, never took a knee and never failed to stand whenever they heard our national anthem being played," he said.

http://www.cnn.com/2016/12/08/us/navy-admiral-colin-kaepernick-speech-trnd/


 

Randy Daytona

Cold War Relic
pilot
Super Moderator
#4
A list of how quickly the ships were returned to service. Note for future reference: if you sink a ship in a harbor, there is a good chance it will live again.

http://www.thedrive.com/news/6388/these-13-u-s-navy-ships-rose-from-the-dead-after-pearl-harbor

These 13 U.S. Navy Ships Rose from the Dead After Pearl Harbor
“Destroyed” isn’t always permanent when there’s a war to be won.


USS Pennsylvania



USS Tennessee (L) next to USS West Virginia


USS Nevada beached after the attack



USS Maryland (L) beside the capsized USS Oklahoma

 

Randy Daytona

Cold War Relic
pilot
Super Moderator
#5
Saw this today - the Japanese were overflying Pearl Harbor in March 1942 to update their intelligence and ended up dropping a few more bombs. Operation K.

Operation K (K作戦 Kē-Sakusen) was a Japanese naval operation in World War II, intended as a reconnaissance of Pearl Harbor and disruption of repair and salvage operations following the surprise attack on 7 December 1941. It culminated on 4 March 1942, with an unsuccessful attack carried out by two Kawanishi H8K"Emily" flying boats. This was the longest distance ever undertaken by a two-plane bombing mission, and one of the longest bombing sorties ever planned without fighter escort.


https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Operation_K

http://www.washingtonexaminer.com/the-second-time-japan-attacked-pearl-harbor/article/2642463


Kawanishi H8K
 

Treetop Flyer

Well-Known Member
pilot
#8
What’s the deal with the two tone paint scheme? The hull and bottom half of the superstructure is dark and the top half light.
 

Renegade One

Well-Known Member
None
#11
What’s the deal with the two tone paint scheme? The hull and bottom half of the superstructure is dark and the top half light.
I think the concept was to make the tops harder to see as they came up over the horizon...what...maybe 20 miles away when viewed from a similar mast height in visual conditions? By the time they were "hull up", I guess it mattered less, except in perhaps confusing a "mast height range estimate".
 

nittany03

FUBIJAR
pilot
None
Super Moderator
Contributor
#12
I think the concept was to make the tops harder to see as they came up over the horizon...what...maybe 20 miles away when viewed from a similar mast height in visual conditions? By the time they were "hull up", I guess it mattered less, except in perhaps confusing a "mast height range estimate".
I guess if you calculated the height of the light paint right, you hypothetically could delay "coming into view" until the main battery was in a more effective range. The Googles seem to show a max range of just under 17nm for the Pennsylvania-class 14-inchers, and a Fuso-class BB's mast height at 130ft, which has a horizon distance of 14nm. OK, done nerding out. Back to coffee.
 

Pags

Well-Known Member
pilot
#13
I think the concept was to make the tops harder to see as they came up over the horizon...what...maybe 20 miles away when viewed from a similar mast height in visual conditions? By the time they were "hull up", I guess it mattered less, except in perhaps confusing a "mast height range estimate".
Which measure a USN ship carried was based on environmentals (north Atlantic vs Pacific) and threats (air vs surface vs sub), and timing in the war as combat experience resulted in new measures. When kamikazes were the predominant threat many ships used Measure 22 to increase their protection from air attack. The measures carried by most of the BBs at Pearl were chosen to counter a surface observation threat.
 

Pags

Well-Known Member
pilot
#14
Which measure a USN ship carried was based on environmentals (north Atlantic vs Pacific) and threats (air vs surface vs sub), and timing in the war as combat experience resulted in new measures. When kamikazes were the predominant threat many ships used Measure 22 to increase their protection from air attack. The measures carried by most of the BBs at Pearl were chosen to counter a surface observation threat.
Oops. Should read MS 21 vice 22 for protection from air detection. While not part of the camo measure PACFLT sailors were also required to dye their Dixie cups blue so as not ruin the camo.
 
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