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Helicopter Air Ambulance Ramblings

Brett327

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Other than having a tender line in place, what is the best practice to arresting this kind of runaway spinning? Based on the apparent speed, I would be very surprised if the victim didn’t have some kind of vascular damage from the force of the blood being forced into her head/eyes.
 

wink

VS NFO. Blue and Gold Officer
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Other than having a tender line in place, what is the best practice to arresting this kind of runaway spinning? Based on the apparent speed, I would be very surprised if the victim didn’t have some kind of vascular damage from the force of the blood being forced into her head/eyes.
I don't know other options to a dedicated line since I never did long line ops. I do know this mission had a tender line and it failed. The rate of spinning looks incredible, but the patient had no ill effects.
 

Brett327

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I don't know other options to a dedicated line since I never did long line ops. I do know this mission had a tender line and it failed. The rate of spinning looks incredible, but the patient had no ill effects.
Says the reporter, who likely doesn't have access to detailed medical info on the victim. That kind of spinning, for a prolonged period of time, is likely to do some damage.
 

wink

VS NFO. Blue and Gold Officer
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Says the reporter, who likely doesn't have access to detailed medical info on the victim. That kind of spinning, for a prolonged period of time, is likely to do some damage.
Nope. Came from news conference with PHX PD/Fire. The Fire Captain said he "looked into her eyes" (after the ride), spoke to her and reported on her condition at the hospital. Of course, he is not an MD, so that probably doesn't satisfy you. But, he ain't no reported without emergency medicine training and experience.
 

Griz882

Well-Known Member
pilot
Other than having a tender line in place, what is the best practice to arresting this kind of runaway spinning? Based on the apparent speed, I would be very surprised if the victim didn’t have some kind of vascular damage from the force of the blood being forced into her head/eyes.
In the NPS we lashed a tree branch to certain loads to act as a "tail" to reduce spinning. You can also use a counter weight, like a steel pipe slung directly under the load as a kind of counterbalance. That said, neither of those options are useful for getting a human being into a helicopter, they are intended for external loads. Like @wink I am not a SAR guy and all my experience was simply with dead weight.
 

Brett327

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To clarify, I’m curious about what to do once the spinning starts, not in how to prevent it.
 

RobLyman

- hawk Pilot
pilot
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Forward airspeed or a headwind helps. The area under a helo roughly at the end of ground effect (for a 60, 45-65') has the highest area of disturbance. Minimize the amount of time in this zone and/or maintain some forward airspeed in this zone and you can reduce the chances this will happen. Once started, fly away at 30 kts or less while climbing. Having gone through this training with Army DES a week and a half ago, I can say it works pretty well.
 

wink

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Nope. Came from news conference with PHX PD/Fire. The Fire Captain said he "looked into her eyes" (after the ride), spoke to her and reported on her condition at the hospital. Of course, he is not an MD, so that probably doesn't satisfy you. But, he ain't no reported without emergency medicine training and experience.
Update. The husband of the 74 year old woman reports that as one might expect, a hematoma has developed on her face (she also broke her nose in the fall) and in her hands and feet even. So, the laws of physics prevail. I believe I heard she experienced 200+ revolutions.
 

Flash

SEVAL/ECMO
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wink

VS NFO. Blue and Gold Officer
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If anyone cares the Assistant Chief for the Phoenix Fire Department quoted in the article, Shelly Jamison, posed for a certain gentlemen's magazine way back in 1989.

//back to our regularly scheduled thread....
How the hell did you find that out? I didn't know that and I am vaguely aware of her career. She has been one of the few female leaders in PFD and well respected. Add another reason to be impressed.
 

Flash

SEVAL/ECMO
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Super Moderator
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How the hell did you find that out? I didn't know that and I am vaguely aware of her career. She has been one of the few female leaders in PFD and well respected. Add another reason to be impressed.
The internet.
 

brownshoe

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