vision requirement for SNA confirmed

Discussion in 'PRK' started by wink, Jun 11, 2005.

  1. RighteousMile

    RighteousMile Cry Freedom

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    Fighter Pilot

    Alright, I'm still pretty confused about the NOMI website. If I want to fly a fighter in the navy, what does my vision have to be? As long as I'm qualified for prk I'm fine right? Or am I restricted to certain aircraft due to my original unaided vision? Sorry this question is probably scattered throughout the website but I don't really have the time to read it all.
  2. Gatordev

    Gatordev Well-Known Member None

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    I don't have a lot of time to answer this, so I'll put it this way:

    The same as it does to fly everything else in the Navy.
    theblakeness likes this.
  3. BACONATOR

    BACONATOR Well-Known Member None

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    Bottom line. to FLY, you need 20/40 or better UNcorrected. Whether this be natural, or waivered through an appropriate PRK procedure, this is the requirement. You must also correct to 20/20 if you are worse than 20/20.
  4. FLYTPAY

    FLYTPAY Pro-Rec Fighter Pilot None None

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    Ah the NAMI Whammy. Get the surgery! I showed up with a piplot contract but was seeing 20/40 the day of my exam. Of course the standards had to be 20/30. I cried like a little girl, decided I would concot this scheme to become a pilot again via S-3B NFO and PRK. There are happy endings!
  5. bongsai

    bongsai New Member

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    In the Ophthalmology section updated March 13, 2007 in the NOMI Waiver Guide, it states:

    "Contact lenses are permissible for aviation personnel, but spare clear spectacles must be carried in flight and the aviator must demonstrate 20/20 with contact usage."

    However, it goes on to say:

    SG1
    Unaided: 20/100 or better each eye
    No NATOPs restrictions

    SG2
    Unaided: 20/200 or better each eye
    * Restricted from shipboard duties including VSTOL
    * Helicopters OK

    SG3
    Unaided: 20/400 or better each eye
    * Dual Controlled only
    * Requires SG1 or 2 onboard
    * Separate Pilot in Command Waiver required

    It seems that YES, you can wear contact lenses without a need for a waiver up to 20/400, but only those who see 20/100 or better without their contact lenses can fly a single-seat F-18 for instance. otherwise, ud have to get prk to get ur ass in that cockpit. correct me if im wrong.
  6. Gatordev

    Gatordev Well-Known Member None

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    What you're quoting has been around for a while and doesn't necessarily pertain to applicants. With the increased use of NVGs, they had to make allowances for contacts, hence the rules you stated above. However, they still flex on allowing contacts for applicants, depending on the numbers game. Understand, I'm not arguing whether they allow them currently, just putting it in perspective.
  7. bongsai

    bongsai New Member

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    i see. i was actually not trying to make the argument that contacts are always allowed. i was actually questioning if there were restrictions on what types of aircraft u can fly if you were 20/400 unaided, but correctable to 20/20 with contacts. it seems like there is based on what i quoted about the 3 classifications SG1, 2, and 3. im 20/400 unaided, but correctable to 20/20 w/contacts, is it true that the only way to fly an f-18 would be to get PRK?
  8. wink

    wink VS NFO. Blue and Gold Off. Former Recruiter. None

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    Right on. And the last I heard the contact lense waiver program was on hold for Navy applicants.
  9. Gatordev

    Gatordev Well-Known Member None

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    Sounds like the short answer is yes. As an applicant, the Navy has no need for a SG2 or 3. They want someone who can go anywhere (community-wise).
  10. SQUIDutah

    SQUIDutah Member None

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    I got mine in March 2007, but anything after that is just speculation until someone else can come forward. It does state on the waiver that I would need to be below the 20/100 mark and carry spare set of glasses anytime flying.
  11. Yetti

    Yetti The Yetti

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    Any word on PRK becoming cheaper? It's ridiculous right now.
  12. Jeff29

    Jeff29 Science Project

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    Not that it really matters, but the PRK for new accessions policy came out in October 2000. I had the surgery in March 2001, got the waiver in June 2001, started flight school in May 2002.

    Unfortunately, the surgeon screwed up, I started having night vision problems, and got NPQ'd about halfway through Advanced.
  13. sharp452

    sharp452 New Member

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    This may sound a little crazy but has any one ever heard of any aviators getting threw with the use of vision therapy?! No Lasik or PRK, just training your eyes naturally with eye excersizes?
  14. Gatordev

    Gatordev Well-Known Member None

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    I've heard of it, and saw a doc who used to work w/ AF guys w/ this technique when I was in HS, but I've not seen first hand accounts.
  15. Beans

    Beans It's about to get nerdy up in here. None

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    Since I've spent most of the past 6 years sitting in front of a computer, reading, or doing a problem set, I decided a while back to start using reading glasses. I discussed it w/ a NAMI optometrist and he said it certainly wouldn't hurt. The idea is that the muscles that control the lens have to work to focus on near objects and relax for distant objects. You can become nearsighted by spending too much time looking at objects up close, or by switching back and forth frequently (such as in a lecture where you're taking notes and then looking at a board or screen), because your eye muscles can become too tight. The theory is that by using reading glasses you take the strain off the eye muscles, which helps them to relax when you want to focus on distant objects. I use a $20 pair of the weakest reading glasses I can find at a pharmacy. Talk to a doc before you try it, but it seems to make my eyes feel better, and I find myself squinting less.

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