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Ultimate Fitness Thread

Another thing that I have added to my morning runs is this simple 100 push-up plan: https://hundredpushups.com/. They also have a 200 sit-up plan and apps to track your sets and progress.
My routine consists of at least 2 mile runs daily at 8:00min/mile pace (distance is dependent on time and weather). High intensity cardio/strength workouts via the Nike Training Club app, 3-4 times per week. Rock climbing 1-2 times per week. Weight lifting 1-2 times per week. I also add flexibility and corrective exercises throughout the my workday. So I'm usually in the gym in the morning before work and in the evening after work.
My push-up reps are still garbage but sit-ups and run are good.
 

peppergunner

ɹǝqɯǝW pǝʇɹǝʌuI
Another thing that I have added to my morning runs is this simple 100 push-up plan: https://hundredpushups.com/. They also have a 200 sit-up plan and apps to track your sets and progress.
My routine consists of at least 2 mile runs daily at 8:00min/mile pace (distance is dependent on time and weather). High intensity cardio/strength workouts via the Nike Training Club app, 3-4 times per week. Rock climbing 1-2 times per week. Weight lifting 1-2 times per week. I also add flexibility and corrective exercises throughout the my workday. So I'm usually in the gym in the morning before work and in the evening after work.
My push-up reps are still garbage but sit-ups and run are good.
I just swapped to those push-up and situp programs because my Stew Smith apps aren't supported on Android Pi.
 

GlassBanger

Agent of Averageness
Contributor
I do HIIT too, usually about 10 minutes every morning and evening. That typically consists of mountain climbers, jumping jacks, pushups, flutterkicks (the devil), burpees, bicycle kicks, Russian twists. I do each exercise for 10/15/20 seconds before switching to the next.
In the evenings I'll run 2 miles for one week, and do 30/60s another week for 10/15 minutes.
 

Sculpin

"Nobody ever changed the world on 40 hours a week"
I've been doing 25x3 push-ups 3 times a day (so about 225 a day) every 2-3 days. It's been working out nicely. Just trying to get to 90-100 consecutive push-ups so I can get back to pure weight lifting.

I'm hoping the Navy eventually adopts something like the new Army PFT. It's a lot more strength-focused whereas existing military PRT across the services is muscle memory focused. My bench press has dropped a good 40 lbs but somehow I'm much better at push-ups. It's all muscle memory. The release push-ups the new Army PFT includes builds/tests some proper strength in your chest which is why they've switched to that. Other events include deadlifts (I really like this), power throws, leg tucks, spring/drag/carry, then a run.
 
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GlassBanger

Agent of Averageness
Contributor
Oh I love the Army's new PFT. It reminds me so much of when I did Crossfit and my strength really grew rapidly. Since leaving Crossfit to focus solely on PFA stuff, some of my muscle and a lot of my strength has been lost, but I can actually do pushups now. It's so weird. I like the release pushups a lot, we did those in CF too. But for some reason regular pushups are so difficult for me still
 

peppergunner

ɹǝqɯǝW pǝʇɹǝʌuI
I've been doing 25x3 push-ups 3 times a day (so about 225 a day) every 2-3 days. It's been working out nicely. Just trying to get to 90-100 consecutive push-ups so I can get back to pure weight lifting.

I'm hoping the Navy eventually adopts something like the new Army PFT. It's a lot more strength-focused whereas existing military PRT across the services is muscle memory focused. My bench press has dropped a good 40 lbs but somehow I'm much better at push-ups. It's all muscle memory. The release push-ups the new Army PFT includes builds/tests some proper strength in your chest which is why they've switched to that. Other events include deadlifts (I really like this), power throws, leg tucks, spring/drag/carry, then a run.
And sit-ups are kind of trash as well. I stumbled on the army thing and got jealous.
 

Sculpin

"Nobody ever changed the world on 40 hours a week"
And sit-ups are kind of trash as well. I stumbled on the army thing and got jealous.
Sit-ups are an excellent way to injure your back, especially when going at diarrhea speed. It's as if the military doesn't have enough back injuries, CECS, etc.

The Army's new thing is hitting problems and it hasn't even been implemented yet.
There's policies to update, equipment to buy, people to train. There's obviously work to do. Regardless, the most physically demanding service is making a big step forward to ensure their PFT better tests what Soldiers are expected to be able to do and also reduces injuries. It's not a cross-country club anymore.
 

AULANI

Active Member
There's policies to update, equipment to buy, people to train. There's obviously work to do. Regardless, the most physically demanding service is making a big step forward to ensure their PFT better tests what Soldiers are expected to be able to do and also reduces injuries. It's not a cross-country club anymore.
Ha! Have you seen people in the Army?
 

GlassBanger

Agent of Averageness
Contributor
Sit-ups are an excellent way to injure your back, especially when going at diarrhea speed. It's as if the military doesn't have enough back injuries, CECS, etc.

There's policies to update, equipment to buy, people to train. There's obviously work to do. Regardless, the most physically demanding service is making a big step forward to ensure their PFT better tests what Soldiers are expected to be able to do and also reduces injuries. It's not a cross-country club anymore.
I LOST it at this omg lol.
While on the topic of unnecessary injuries, the decision to start issuing go fasters to us at OCS is frustrating too, as I've heard nothing but complaints from any sailor I've ever talked to, especially about knee and foot injury, and was pretty excited when I started this process that OCS had us bring our own sneakers for training. Womp womp.

Whoah whoah whoah, I don't know what I would say the Army is the most physically demanding service at all, have you not heard of the Marine Corps?
 

Sculpin

"Nobody ever changed the world on 40 hours a week"
Ha! Have you seen people in the Army?
Yes sir. I've also seen people in the Navy, of course. I also know the Navy doesn't as a norm do rucks, endless smoke sessions, endless PT your whole career if your MOS is remotely combat-related (and still a bit much even if you're not), require strength and muscle building, and don't let you ride a stationary bike if running is hard on your feet or knees or what-have-you. If flat-footed people with past spinal injuries, survived IEDs, and developed CECS are still running and can lift absurd amounts of weight, then I don't know what's to be said about perfectly healthy people.

I LOST it at this omg lol.
While on the topic of unnecessary injuries, the decision to start issuing go fasters to us at OCS is frustrating too, as I've heard nothing but complaints from any sailor I've ever talked to, especially about knee and foot injury, and was pretty excited when I started this process that OCS had us bring our own sneakers for training. Womp womp.

Whoah whoah whoah, I don't know what I would say the Army is the most physically demanding service at all, have you not heard of the Marine Corps?
It's not news to anyone that running far too much can actually be bad for you, especially once you've hit your 30s. I see a lot more injuries from running than from anything else.

Have I heard of the Marines? :) I know the Marines rather intimately, and have additionally lived close to 2 major bases where basically everyone are Marines. Of course I've heard of them heh. Then I met and dealt with some people in the Army and discovered a lot there and it's quite a world of difference. I've also come across Army POGs who went Marines to make things easier on themselves which should tell you enough of the story. You can't look at Raiders (special forces) and some of the 03's and say that's the Marine Corps. I regularly meet Marines who are physically not capable of doing much besides cranking out 3 miles in some amount time, being very good at marching (the Marines are all about that), and "getting by" with everything else. As President Truman put it, "They have a propaganda machine that is almost equal to Stalin's."

The difference is people look at PFT as the end-be-all. Yes, Marines run 3 miles for it, and they also do pull-ups which are not hard at all with a little practice, and you only have to do a few. People look at the 3 mile run in the PFT and think that's some golden standard. Even Navy sailors have to run 3 miles multiple times a week. The other difference is the Marine Corps is more of a peanut butter spread, while the Army is highly advanced and specialized across a ridiculous number of areas. So your average Marine recruit in San Diego (less so Parris Island) obviously has tougher basic than some Army civil affairs recruit trained at "Relaxin' Jackson" (not even Benning) who then gets posted at some crappy base somewhere whose job is basically paperwork. After that point, it's not terribly physically demanding for either side. But if we're comparing Marine infantry with any Army combat MOS, you really can't compare them in terms of the training, physical demands, specialization and learning, etc. The Army simply operates on a much higher level. It's no surprise either that the Marine Corps' existence gets questioned, even by POTUSes.

The Marine Corps in terms of training and also upkeep focus heavily on drills, and you get to do it in relaxing San Diego, Parris Island, or Quantico, and then most the base locations aren't bad either. It's very very huge on drill discipline and tradition. No one drills and marches better than the Marines, no doubt about that. Unless your MOS is animal care or something of a similarly relaxed nature, the Army does everything it can do to physically kill you in mud, sleet, etc. in backcountry Georgia and Kentucky and other very unsavory places, all year long.


However, the Marines' "claim to fame" PFT is no longer a valid argument for them being the most physically demanding. The new Army PFT is substantially more challenging than the Marines' PFT. You'll find too many Marines who are 120-140 lbs and can do the PFT because they run a lot and only ever have to do muscle memory exercises. Good luck with that in the Army, those kinds people won't survive the crazy amounts of rucking they do. Now with the new PFT, you are absolutely required to have a good degree of muscle and strength to continue being a Soldier, and Soldiers are required by convention to have a much greater degree of fitness than Marines. Once the new system is completely rolled out, it's not even a discussion anymore about who is more physically demanding. Don't be surprised if the Navy eventually follows suit. There's already been lots of talk about making job-specific PRTs or incorporating strength tests, planks, and other things.
 
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AULANI

Active Member
Yes sir. I've also seen people in the Navy, of course. I also know the Navy doesn't as a norm do rucks, endless smoke sessions, endless PT your whole career if your MOS is remotely combat-related (and still a bit much even if you're not), require strength and muscle building, and don't let you ride a stationary bike if running is hard on your feet or knees or what-have-you. If flat-footed people with past spinal injuries, survived IEDs, and developed CECS are still running and can lift absurd amounts of weight, then I don't know what's to be said about perfectly healthy people.
They're not healthy, that's what you can say about them.
 
OP, What pamphlet is that? It looks like something that would actually help a bit. Currently running an 11:30 1.5 but would like to get that sub 10. I know you're headed off in 10 days, so I don't expect a reply necessarily! Good luck man if you have that info that would be great.
 
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