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Private pilot license with military hours?

MIDNJAC

is clara ship
pilot
#46
alright.. you got me...not everyone.... I fixed it for you...:D
Well the Malibu is all I care about :p


I keed

Good question though....what is the difference between the warrior and comanche? I've flown the warrior, not the comanche, but they look and seem to be very similar aircraft.
 

ryan1234

Active Member
#47
Well the Malibu is all I care about :p


I keed

Good question though....what is the difference between the warrior and comanche? I've flown the warrior, not the comanche, but they look and seem to be very similar aircraft.
The Warrior/Cherokee was designed as a primary trainer to compete with the 172... the Commanche was designed more for speed, retract (think it has like 260hp), designed to compete with the Bonanza - It's a really nice plane to fly, though a little touchy (It's plagued by a buncha ADs also)... but they all have that "stabilator" - I guess that's what makes them feel a little heavier out of trim.

For some more not so useful knowledge....The Malibu was actually developed from a pressurized version of the Commanche. It seems like there's a billion Piper models and variations of each.
 

yak52driver

Active Member
Contributor
#48
I do actually have a manual written about how to do aerobatics in a 152....perhaps slightly different animal, but I doubt too much. With the exception of loops/cuban eight/immelman/split-S most of the basic aerobatics we did in the T-34 did not exceed 2 G's which I'd think would be well within the realm of possibility in a Cessna. That said you would clearly have to modify your technique to deal with the comparatively low amount of power.
I teach akro in an Aerobat, it can do quite a bit of akro if you learn to do it correctly. The manual you mention is probably the one written by William Kershner. I can actually get my students to the point they can fly aerobatic sequences like spin/loop/half cuban/4 point roll before we run out of altitude. It does nice avalanches (loop with a snap roll from inverted on the top of the loop). I don't teach inverted or outside maneuvers (no inverted fuel/oil) or hammerheads. With two people the speed bleeds off so quickly it's too easy to end up in a tail slide.

You're right, it is different than a standard 152. It's stressed for +6/-3 g's, it weighs more because of the extra structure. But it has a stock engine (110 hp on a very good day) so it's dive to get airspeed. But I like it as an aerobatic trainer.
 

FlyingOnFumes

Nobel WAR Prize Aspirant
#49
I teach akro in an Aerobat, it can do quite a bit of akro if you learn to do it correctly. The manual you mention is probably the one written by William Kershner. I can actually get my students to the point they can fly aerobatic sequences like spin/loop/half cuban/4 point roll before we run out of altitude. It does nice avalanches (loop with a snap roll from inverted on the top of the loop). I don't teach inverted or outside maneuvers (no inverted fuel/oil) or hammerheads. With two people the speed bleeds off so quickly it's too easy to end up in a tail slide.

You're right, it is different than a standard 152. It's stressed for +6/-3 g's, it weighs more because of the extra structure. But it has a stock engine (110 hp on a very good day) so it's dive to get airspeed. But I like it as an aerobatic trainer.
I dislike any aerobatic trainer that uses a yoke instead of a stick....
 

yak52driver

Active Member
Contributor
#50
I dislike any aerobatic trainer that uses a yoke instead of a stick....
In a perfect world I'd be teaching in a plane with a stick, but it's what I have to work with and almost as important, it's way more affordable for the average pilot than the almost $400 an hour for training in a high performance akro aircraft.
 

MIDNJAC

is clara ship
pilot
#51
Speaking of which, why do folks insist on saying acro? It is aerobatics, not acrobatics. Maybe I'm being nitpicky here but I don't see where the term comes from....
 

yak52driver

Active Member
Contributor
#52
Speaking of which, why do folks insist on saying acro? It is aerobatics, not acrobatics. Maybe I'm being nitpicky here but I don't see where the term comes from....
The FAA uses the term acrobatic to reference the category that an aircraft is certified in, normal, utility, acrobatic and commuter (part 23 of the FARs). The actual flying of maneuvers is referred to as aerobatic flight (part 91 of the FARS). I've heard both used, akro being the short version in conversation.
 

huggyu2

Well-Known Member
None
#53
Speaking of which, why do folks insist on saying acro? It is aerobatics, not acrobatics.
Agreed.
If you do "acro", then you're an "acrobat".
I, for one, think of an "acrobat" as one of the little girls in my daughters gymnastic classes.
I don't look good in tights, and don't put my hair in a bun. I'm not an "acrobat".
 

invertedflyer

500 ft. from said obstacle
#54
The Warrior/Cherokee was designed as a primary trainer to compete with the 172... the Commanche was designed more for speed, retract (think it has like 260hp), designed to compete with the Bonanza - It's a really nice plane to fly, though a little touchy (It's plagued by a buncha ADs also)... but they all have that "stabilator" - I guess that's what makes them feel a little heavier out of trim.

For some more not so useful knowledge....The Malibu was actually developed from a pressurized version of the Commanche. It seems like there's a billion Piper models and variations of each.
It depends on the type of Comanche, most have 250-260 HP, but the Comanche 180 has a 180 HP engine. I've actually never had the opportunity to take one up, I did manage to take an Arrow out once though.
 

insanebikerboy

Internet killed the television star
pilot
Contributor
#55
It's always an interesting phase of flight when I refresh or get a new checkout in a whatever-plane and do a Navy style approach from the 180 for landing. At this point it's what's most comfortable for me so that's why I do it. The guy I flew with out in San Diego only said "damn Navy pilots" and then signed me off :)
 

A4sForever

INTERNET BULLY
pilot
Contributor
#56
....The guy I flew with out in San Diego only said "damn Navy pilots" and then signed me off :)
The 'guy' I flew w/ out of Randolph AFB said the same thing about me when I was gettin' my 'I'm getting OUT of the NAVY' ATP through their flying club ... then, the left gear broke in the C-310 and after multiple passes by the tower to verify that we were 'fucked' ... guess who he had land the fuckin' airplane on the final/final to touchdown and semi-crash roll-out @ Randolph ...

First 350 guesses don't count. :)
 

BACONATOR

Well-Known Member
pilot
Contributor
#57
The 'guy' I flew w/ out of Randolph AFB said the same thing about me when I was gettin' my 'I'm getting OUT of the NAVY' ATP through their flying club ... then, the left gear broke in the C-310 and after multiple passes by the tower to verify that we were 'fucked' ... guess who he had land the fuckin' airplane on the final/final to touchdown and semi-crash roll-out @ Randolph ...

First 350 guesses don't count. :)
How did that work? I mean on a civilian flight, obviously there's no ranking officer, but as the "IP", I wouldn't expect them to let a "student" take the controls on an emergency landing.
 

A4sForever

INTERNET BULLY
pilot
Contributor
#58
How did that work? I mean on a civilian flight, obviously there's no ranking officer, but as the "IP", I wouldn't expect them to let a "student" take the controls on an emergency landing.

He had beaucoup hours in type ... I had few ... but I was a better pilot than he -- and he knew it.

Thus ... he deferred to me as I 'handled' the emergency (he agreed w/ every single call/appraisal of the situation that emanated from my mouth) and I drove it onto the runway, through the ground-loop, and holding hands --- together we scampered through & across the AVGAS all over the runway, compliments of the broken left wing tip-tank ...

It wasn't our time to die ... :)
 

Gatordev

Well-Known Member
pilot
Site Admin
Contributor
#60

He had beaucoup hours in type ... I had few ... but I was a better pilot than he -- and he knew it.

Thus ... he deferred to me as I 'handled' the emergency (he agreed w/ every single call/appraisal of the situation that emanated from my mouth) and I drove it onto the runway, through the ground-loop, and holding hands --- together we scampered through & across the AVGAS all over the runway, compliments of the broken left wing tip-tank ...
At least he was smart enough to acknowledge it. I'd be more concerned if didn't have the SA to do that.

100LL (or maybe 80/87?) powered Hercs.......those must have REALLY been the pioneering days of flight :p
Reading comprehension... C-310 =/= C-130