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Private pilot license with military hours?

FlyingOnFumes

Nobel WAR Prize Aspirant
#16
I think to get the Inst. Airplane if you already have Inst. Helo you would need 15hrs instrument fixed wing time, take the oral/practical tests but no written test. There are some additional FW reqs but if you have a C-ASEL/MEL I suspect you've probably already gotten those.
A fixed wing Instrument Rating (if you already have a Multi-Engine Land with Instrument or Rotorcraft Instrument) should be only an "add-on" rating (vs. doing another 40 hours again).

I was not aware that no knowledge exam was required for SEL add-on... but then again... if you already have a commercial SEL with Instrument, getting a MEL with Instrument Commercial is also only an add-on rating with no min. time (just to proficiency as determined by the MEI and passing the practical test with an FAA Inspector or Designated Examiner) and no Knowledge exam.

I could have sworn though that Rotorcraft have a separate set of questions than fixed wing that would make it necessary to take a fixed wing knowledge exam (unless the fixed wing is a subset of the Rotorcraft... i.e. the rotorcraft exam bank includes fixed wing stuff too)...
 

C420sailor

Rhino Bro
pilot
#17
The question remains... why would you want to jump through all of these hoops for a solo in a 172, when you get to fly a high performance aircraft with top-notch instruction for free?
Sometimes it's nice to just go bombing around and do whatever the hell you want without an IP being all up in your shit. I do it now and then. It's also nice to be able to say "sure" when that hottie back home asks you to take her flying.

But is it worth $2000? Probably not. Especially if you're already in advanced.

While you might find a CFI who will sign off on local area endorsements every X days, good luck finding an airplane to rent without your PPL. No one in their right mind would rent you their airplane if you're on that scheme.
 

ryan1234

Active Member
#18
A fixed wing Instrument Rating (if you already have a Multi-Engine Land with Instrument or Rotorcraft Instrument) should be only an "add-on" rating (vs. doing another 40 hours again).

I was not aware that no knowledge exam was required for SEL add-on... but then again... if you already have a commercial SEL with Instrument, getting a MEL with Instrument Commercial is also only an add-on rating with no min. time (just to proficiency as determined by the MEI and passing the practical test with an FAA Inspector or Designated Examiner) and no Knowledge exam.

I could have sworn though that Rotorcraft have a separate set of questions than fixed wing that would make it necessary to take a fixed wing knowledge exam (unless the fixed wing is a subset of the Rotorcraft... i.e. the rotorcraft exam bank includes fixed wing stuff too)...
The RW does have a seperate test bank for instrument but the differences are addressed in the PTS TASKs and SE areas... So long story short, the examiner will just make sure you know the things unique to RW.... No need for the written test.

As far as adding on a rating with an instrument rating (SEL to MEL) the examiner usually just gives you an engine failure on an instrument approach. No big deal if you have your ducks in a row, but most people fail that part if they don't have much experience in a multi (just the hours req for a Comm multi add on).
 

FlyingOnFumes

Nobel WAR Prize Aspirant
#19
While you might find a CFI who will sign off on local area endorsements every X days, good luck finding an airplane to rent without your PPL. No one in their right mind would rent you their airplane if you're on that scheme.
Why would it be an issue if you, in essence, became a "student" of that flight school? For all intents and purposes, you don't have to say anything about your T-34C time in the Navy; just go through the motions of becoming a student pilot like any other.... hopefully with your skill level, you should be able to demonstrate solo proficiency in short order, once you get signed off for solo.... just remain a solo student indefinitely, getting your 90-day endorsements.
 

C420sailor

Rhino Bro
pilot
#20
Why would it be an issue if you, in essence, became a "student" of that flight school? For all intents and purposes, you don't have to say anything about your T-34C time in the Navy; just go through the motions of becoming a student pilot like any other.... hopefully with your skill level, you should be able to demonstrate solo proficiency in short order, once you get signed off for solo.... just remain a solo student indefinitely, getting your 90-day endorsements.
True, if you want to stay local. But if you go home or visit someone, don't even think about rolling up to the FBO with your logbook with solo endorsement and asking to rent an airplane. They'll laugh you right out the door.
 

A4sForever

INTERNET BULLY
pilot
Contributor
#22
.... While you might find a CFI who will sign off on local area endorsements every X days, good luck finding an airplane to rent without your PPL. No one in their right mind would rent you their airplane ... don't even think about rolling up to the FBO with your logbook with solo endorsement and asking to rent an airplane. They'll laugh you right out the door.
THIS ... is key.

As a matter of fact, if you listen kinda' carefully ... you'll be able to hear the laughter clear out in the parking lot ... as you dejectedly drive away with your 'date' who will never 'date' you again ... loser .... :icon_lol::icon_lol::icon_lol::icon_lol:
 

FlyingOnFumes

Nobel WAR Prize Aspirant
#24
And then get a cross country endorsement to go anywhere outside of home field!?
You will never get such an endorsement. Cross-country endorsements are only to specific airports.

as you dejectedly drive away with your 'date' who will never 'date' you again ... loser .... :icon_lol::icon_lol::icon_lol::icon_lol:
This is a moot point since you won't be able to carry PAX anyway.


This possible "loophole" is only to allow you to solo (if that's all you want to do) without having to get your entire Private Pilot cert. It will only work at a given flight school (you are in essence becoming a student pilot at that school and going through the motions... with the exception that you already have a crap load of flight time already so you should be able to, in theory, breeze through the requirements to get a solo endorsement) and it won't be transferable from flight school to flight school.
 

MIDNJAC

is clara ship
pilot
#25
I remember reading a story about how Chuck Yeager (or maybe it was Bob Hoover, can't remember) checked into a civilian flight school under an assumed name, failed to mention his flight experience, and went through the motions of all the training flights up to a solo. Got signed off by a young female CFI, and proceeded (to her horror) to take it up over the field and put on an aerobatic show. God I hope that story was true :D
 

BACONATOR

Well-Known Member
pilot
Contributor
#26
I remember reading a story about how Chuck Yeager (or maybe it was Bob Hoover, can't remember) checked into a civilian flight school under an assumed name, failed to mention his flight experience, and went through the motions of all the training flights up to a solo. Got signed off by a young female CFI, and proceeded (to her horror) to take it up over the field and put on an aerobatic show. God I hope that story was true :D
I'd like to do this at some point. Go to an FBO, and rent a plane and a CFI for an "intro" or "sightseeing flight" giving the info that I have "some" prior experience, and see if they can tell. Worst case I suck and they don't know. Best case, a funny joke. :D

(in all seriousness, if you can't fly the shit out of a C172 as a Naval Aviator, I'd be surprised).
 

ryan1234

Active Member
#27
If you do aerobatics in a 172 you have balls of steel - especially FBO maintained aircraft that probably have been overstressed a major portion of their life - a lot of FBO 172s are actually mutts - wings and tails from other aircraft mixed with this and that.... If anyone can actually do real aerobatics in a 172 that would be very impressive - that sucker has one of the slowest roll rates ever - and with a Va of 105 it doesn't leave much room for anything.
 

MIDNJAC

is clara ship
pilot
#28
If you do aerobatics in a 172 you have balls of steel - especially FBO maintained aircraft that probably have been overstressed a major portion of their life - a lot of FBO 172s are actually mutts - wings and tails from other aircraft mixed with this and that.... If anyone can actually do real aerobatics in a 172 that would be very impressive - that sucker has one of the slowest roll rates ever - and with a Va of 105 it doesn't leave much room for anything.
I do actually have a manual written about how to do aerobatics in a 152....perhaps slightly different animal, but I doubt too much. With the exception of loops/cuban eight/immelman/split-S most of the basic aerobatics we did in the T-34 did not exceed 2 G's which I'd think would be well within the realm of possibility in a Cessna. That said you would clearly have to modify your technique to deal with the comparatively low amount of power.
 

BACONATOR

Well-Known Member
pilot
Contributor
#29
I do actually have a manual written about how to do aerobatics in a 152....perhaps slightly different animal, but I doubt too much. With the exception of loops/cuban eight/immelman/split-S most of the basic aerobatics we did in the T-34 did not exceed 2 G's which I'd think would be well within the realm of possibility in a Cessna. That said you would clearly have to modify your technique to deal with the comparatively low amount of power.
There is a specific model of 152 called the aerobat. Not sure if it's a more powerful engine or different airframe, but I believe it is a separate model in its own right.

EDIT: it appears the aerobat was just rated for aerobatic G limits.
 

ryan1234

Active Member
#30
I do actually have a manual written about how to do aerobatics in a 152....perhaps slightly different animal, but I doubt too much. With the exception of loops/cuban eight/immelman/split-S most of the basic aerobatics we did in the T-34 did not exceed 2 G's which I'd think would be well within the realm of possibility in a Cessna. That said you would clearly have to modify your technique to deal with the comparatively low amount of power.
I think you're talking about the Cessna Aerobat - it had a 4 point harness and was stressed for a bit more - designed for limited aerobatics. It actually contained an aerobatic manual as well... if my memory serves me right it could do pretty much everything except inverted/flat spins, whip stalls, snap rolls, tailslides, or prolonged inverted flight. Entry speed for most stuff was like 120mph...The A150 was a lot more responsive than the 172.

Like you said a modification of technique is required - the 172 doesn't really have great control authority- now it's probably possible.... but it would probably scare the poop outta the instructor (since CFIs don't require hardcore aerobatic training).
 
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