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NROTC to USNA

#16
That's risky at best. Assuming he drops and submits an OCS package he will need to explain why he turned down an officer commission through USNA. Simply saying, "I wanted a real college experience" won't cut it.
The Blackwater founder Erik Prince made precisely that: quit USNA as sophomore and obtain commission via OCS couple of years later, meeting all BUD requirements openly using his Academy papers (scuba lisence etc). Details in his book "Civilian Warriors".
 

xmid

Registered User
pilot
Contributor
#17
That's risky at best. Assuming he drops and submits an OCS package he will need to explain why he turned down an officer commission through USNA. Simply saying, "I wanted a real college experience" won't cut it.
This. I left the academy after plebe year and eventually went to OCS. I was young and stupid and made life much harder on myself. You will be fighting an uphill battle to get back in to any commissioning program. If I could go back in time I wouldn't have left. The things you think you are missing out on are overrated. There's plenty of time to drink to much and chase tail or whatever in flight school. If going to USNA meant enough to you to leave a ROTC scholarship it will probably mean even more to you you 20, 30, or 40 years from now.
 

xmid

Registered User
pilot
Contributor
#18
The Blackwater founder Erik Prince made precisely that: quit USNA as sophomore and obtain commission via OCS couple of years later, meeting all BUD requirements openly using his Academy papers (scuba lisence etc). Details in his book "Civilian Warriors".
I've read the book, and it was insightful. That being said, this is bad gouge. The SEAL's did not and do not care about a summer dive qual.There is almost nothing you could gain in your USNA record that would shed a positive light on your quitting. Erik Prince is an anomaly. He was also able to leave the military early because he inherited a billion dollar business. His experience does not correlate to 99.999999999999999999999% of the people that may read his book.
 
#19
Erik Prince is an anomaly. He was also able to leave the military early because he inherited a billion dollar business. His experience does not correlate to 99.999999999999999999999% of the people that may read his book.
I supposed just that, thanks. Anyway, is that legal by US standards to quit before the end of obligations if you are the one to inherit big business? Here it's not the case. And generally, I completely don't understand how the youth of free world could chose the service academy, a soft prison by any society's view. In Russia about 97% of all officers of all branches are from army/naval/af colleges, that are all the replicas of old Prussian military academy style: march-spit-and-polish-screem-aim-fire-yes-sir-no-excuse-etc from the age of 16. If I at my 16 had something like ROTC ot OCS at 20-21, I wouldn't even think about standard naval college for a minute.
 

Flash

SEVAL/ECMO
None
Super Moderator
Contributor
#20
Anyway, is that legal by US standards to quit before the end of obligations if you are the one to inherit big business?
You can in fact request and receive a discharge if you get an 'unexpected windfall' like a very large inheritance or win the lottery, like this AO in 2004, in the Navy and Marines I believe it falls under 'Separation by Reason of Convenience of the Government' and is at the service's discretion. You don't have to be discharged but it is an option.
 

Uncle Fester

Robot Pimp
None
Super Moderator
Contributor
#21
You can in fact request and receive a discharge if you get an 'unexpected windfall' like a very large inheritance or win the lottery, like this AO in 2004, in the Navy and Marines I believe it falls under 'Separation by Reason of Convenience of the Government' and is at the service's discretion. You don't have to be discharged but it is an option.
Huh, I’ll be damned. There was a rumor going around when I was in the VTs that some RSS student had won the McDonalds Monopoly grand prize and was therefore being discharged. The particular rumor was bullshit, but I thought so was that regulation. Wonder what the rationale is behind it?

“We pull into Jebal next week. Bobo’s paying for the Admin.”
“What? No I’m not.”
“Fuck you, Uncle Pennybags, yes you are.”
 

Flash

SEVAL/ECMO
None
Super Moderator
Contributor
#22
Huh, I’ll be damned. There was a rumor going around when I was in the VTs that some RSS student had won the McDonalds Monopoly grand prize and was therefore being discharged. The particular rumor was bullshit, but I thought so was that regulation. Wonder what the rationale is behind it?
I believe because the possibility the recipient of the unexpected windfall could become disruptive to 'good order and discipline' due to their newfound wealth.
 
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Uncle Fester

Robot Pimp
None
Super Moderator
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#23
I believe because the possibility the recipient of the unexpected windfall could become disruptive to 'good order and discipline' due to their newfound wealth.
I suppose that's plausible. Though the Brits made it work for a few hundred years, when gentlemen officers were expected to have 'private means'.

 

DanMa1156

Land of the Milk and Honey.
pilot
Contributor
#24
You can in fact request and receive a discharge if you get an 'unexpected windfall' like a very large inheritance or win the lottery, like this AO in 2004, in the Navy and Marines I believe it falls under 'Separation by Reason of Convenience of the Government' and is at the service's discretion. You don't have to be discharged but it is an option.
Chump change. I had a sailor literally have a rich uncle die that he had no idea about. I believe the guy was the head of GM Asia. The IRS kept nagging my Sailor and he thought it was all a scam until finally a lawyer called him and was like "DON'T HANG UP. THIS IS NOT A SCAM. You had a rich uncle and you've just stepped into a $180 million dollars and properties in several countries throughout Asia. This is why the IRS keeps nagging you - they are legit and yes, you owe some taxes." He ended up staying in because of the opportunities he felt the Navy gave him; he swears he would be in jail if he didn't get the discipline. Our intel-O had to do an investigation since he had a secret clearance and apparently walking into a metric ton of money raises some flags. Ended up being all legit. Last I heard from him, he was building a very customized house in Pacific Beach.
 

Flash

SEVAL/ECMO
None
Super Moderator
Contributor
#25
I suppose that's plausible. Though the Brits made it work for a few hundred years, when gentlemen officers were expected to have 'private means'.
The Brits still do, while not in the same numbers some of the aristocracy still serve but they already have the money when they get in. That is where the 'unexpected windfall' part comes in where someone who may not be used to that much money possibly having issues. Again, not a requirement like DanMa says but an option for the very few it applies to.
 
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#26
You can in fact request and receive a discharge if you get an 'unexpected windfall' like a very large inheritance or win the lottery, like this AO in 2004, in the Navy and Marines I believe it falls under 'Separation by Reason of Convenience of the Government' and is at the service's discretion. You don't have to be discharged but it is an option.
Thank you Flash. And, after been discharged by such case, can s/he, at least in theory, restore the commission later, whatever the reason? If so, this is the best survived manifestation of the liberal values, I think. What about Brits - I was amazed by the confessions of Cmdr Charles Lamb in his book "War in a Stringbag", where he expressed the statement that it was impossible to draw the living wage from the Royal Navy in 1939 for a minimal family of two, a RN Lieutenant could live by pure officer's salary only being single. Everyone who planned marriage had to have some money from outside, and his Commanding Officer traditionally in charge of approval the wedding, had to know about these outer sources. "The salary is just for a poker table in an O-club. You should have much more from your parental family or alike".
 
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