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Noob PRK Questions

Scruff

Registered User
None
Contributor
#1
Ok I have to get PRK done within the next month or so. I've talked to my recruiter who seems like a pretty smart guy, but I don't think he's had to deal with any type of eye waivers. So when I asked about getting PRK done, he said just go get it done. I was under the impression that I had to get a pre-op done and submit it to MEPS before I did anything. My eyes aren't bad but had the pre-op done before I went to my recruiter and he just made a copy. Does that form need to be submitted?

Also, I was told by a friend (who just graduated OCS) to try and get LASEK (with an e) instead of the standard PRK. I looked into the NAMI waiver guide and under 12.15 it does list LASEK as a variant of PRK. So would anybody else recommend trying to get LASEK done instead of the standard procedure. Anybody know the benefits? I don't want to do anything stupid and get DQ'd by LASEK, when I know for sure that the standard PRK will be fine.

Thanks for any input.
 

hokieav8r

~Bring the Wood!~
None
#2
I'm bored today

(4) Aviation Warfare. All forms of corneal surgery are disqualifying. PRK is the only procedure that will be considered for waiver. (A) air warfare new accession applicants having had PRK (civilians, NROTC, Naval Academy and enlisted accessions) may be waivered for aviation duty if they meet all the following criteria:

a. Accepted into a Navy-approved PRK study protocol for long-term follow-up

b. Pre-PRK refractive error was less than or equal to plus or minus 5.50 (total) diopters in any meridian with less than or equal to plus or minus 3.00 diopters of cylinder and anisometropia less than or equal to 3.50 diopters.

c. Civilian applicants must provide detailed pre-operative, operative, and post-operative PRK follow-up records prior to acceptance into a Navy approved PRK study.

d. At least three months have elapsed since surgery or re-treatment and evidence of stable refractive error is demonstrated by two separate examinations performed at least one month apart.

e. Meet all other applicant entrance criteria as delineated in references (A) and (D) and as specified by approved aviation PRK-study protocols.

Designated Naval aviation personnel (flying class one, flying class two, and class three designated enlisted aircrew and flight deck personnel), upon approval by their commanding officers, may seek acceptance into a Navy PRK aviation study protocol involving actual PRK surgery. A waiver to return to flight duties will be recommended if they meet all study requirements and all other physical standards as delineated in references (A) and (D).

Personnel electing the surgery must receive authorization from their commanding officer prior to the procedure.

For more information concerning corneal refractive surgery and PRK in the Navy/Marine Corps, go to http://navymedicine_dev/refractive_questions.htm

POCS are:

1. General Accessions: CMDR L. Grubb, MC, MED-25; 202 762-3482; DSN 762; email: lkgrubb@us.med.navy.mil.

2. Undersea/Diving/Special Warfare: CAPT J Murray, MC, MED-21; 202 762-3449; DSN 762; email: jwmurray@us.med.navy.mil.

3. Surface Warfare: CAPT J. Montgomery, MC, MED-22; 202 762-3466; DSN 762; email: jrmontgomery@us.med.navy.mil.

4.Air Warfare: CAPT C. Barker, MC, MED-23B; 202 762-3451; DSN 762; email: cobarker@us.med.navy.mil.

5. Reserves: LT T. Wolfkill, MSC, MED-07A; 202 762-3418; DSN 762; email: tjwolfkill@us.med.navy.mil.

Retain copy of this message until applicable changes are made in Reference (A) or are superseded by future changes.

VICE ADM R.A. Nelson, Navy Surgeon General




I found this in the automatically generated list of related threads posted by the webmaster. I think there are enough POCs on there to keep you occupied and answer any and all questions.

Enjoy
 

nugget61

Active Member
pilot
#3
This is kinda bulleted, sorry.
-Yeah, you pretty much can just go out and have it done. The doc will do a thorough pre-op, which you will have to turn in with the actual operation report and all of the check-up reports.
-No documents need be submitted until you are +6months post op.
-You should ensure you meet the pre-op standards (listed in the waiver guide, section 12.15 as you mentioned) so you don't waste the money if you're too far gone.
-PRK = lasEk. I've seen people talk on here recently about lasIk being approved, but at this point in the game you probably just want to go with PRK.
-Your friend probably meant Wavefront Guided PRK (WFG PRK) which is the standard today... would get a new doc if they don't do WFG.
-fyi, I had WFG done in November and just got my OK from recruiting command
 

Scruff

Registered User
None
Contributor
#4
Thanks for the info guys,
So i should go to the Doctor that is doing my surgery's office and bring him the 12.15 document on pre-rec's to make sure I qualify? Let's say I do and then approves that i qualify. I don't need to send this info in? Just go ahead with the surgery? And at the 6 month post op I send the pre-rec document in with everything else eye related?
 

jtmedli

Well-Known Member
pilot
#5
Thanks for the info guys,
So i should go to the Doctor that is doing my surgery's office and bring him the 12.15 document on pre-rec's to make sure I qualify? Let's say I do and then approves that i qualify. I don't need to send this info in? Just go ahead with the surgery? And at the 6 month post op I send the pre-rec document in with everything else eye related?
yes, Make sure that your doc knows your future career choice and what that requires medically speaking. If you're not sure then call someone who can give you the pertinent information and take it with you and let the doc read it and evaluate your position. You could easily have the surgery done, see pretty well and still not qualify for aviation (i.e. astigmatism issues and whatnot). Make absolutely sure that when it's all said and done that you and your doctor are on the same page before you do anything.