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non aviator lat transfer into usmc or army

#1
I attrited from API. Passed the tests, but one point short on my NSS from being pushed forward into Primary. Sent an appeal up, got denied, moped around for a bit now moving on.

I want to fly for the military above everything else. Spent some enlisted time in the Army and had my life saved by pilots and haven't thought about much else other than being that guy saving those on the ground since then. Since my attrition I've explored flying for the Air Force, Army, USMC, and the CG. Every avenue I was told either no, or maybe.......... but probably no. From what I gathered so far it seems that flying for the Army as a Warrant is the only remotely possible route. If it doesn't work then I'm off to find a new job.

What I'm asking for is guidance on whatever path you're knowledgeable on, as well as general advice from whatever experience you have in recruiting, branch transfers etc.

To be clear, my goals in order from most wanted and least attainable to least wanted are:
1. Getting bak into Naval Aviation. Willing to do whatever, go wherever, speak to whoever.
2. Fly for another branch. Army tops that list. Contacted my congressman, visited Army Flight School, made tons of phone calls. I've been told both I need a waiver since I attended another DOD sourced flight school, and have been told it isn't possible
3. NFO
4. USMC ground officer. If I can't serve from the sky, i'd want to get back as close to the ground as possible.
5. Army officer. Same reasons.
6. Navy EOD. Mostly as an if I have to stay here kind of option. Awesome gig. Just not preferred for a few reasons.

Thank you for whatever help you guys can offer. If you'd rather talk some other way just let me know and I'll get you some private contact info.
 

Griz882

Well-Known Member
pilot
#2
I attrited from API. Passed the tests, but one point short on my NSS from being pushed forward into Primary. Sent an appeal up, got denied, moped around for a bit now moving on.

I want to fly for the military above everything else. Spent some enlisted time in the Army and had my life saved by pilots and haven't thought about much else other than being that guy saving those on the ground since then. Since my attrition I've explored flying for the Air Force, Army, USMC, and the CG. Every avenue I was told either no, or maybe.......... but probably no. From what I gathered so far it seems that flying for the Army as a Warrant is the only remotely possible route. If it doesn't work then I'm off to find a new job.

What I'm asking for is guidance on whatever path you're knowledgeable on, as well as general advice from whatever experience you have in recruiting, branch transfers etc.

To be clear, my goals in order from most wanted and least attainable to least wanted are:
1. Getting bak into Naval Aviation. Willing to do whatever, go wherever, speak to whoever.
2. Fly for another branch. Army tops that list. Contacted my congressman, visited Army Flight School, made tons of phone calls. I've been told both I need a waiver since I attended another DOD sourced flight school, and have been told it isn't possible
3. NFO
4. USMC ground officer. If I can't serve from the sky, i'd want to get back as close to the ground as possible.
5. Army officer. Same reasons.
6. Navy EOD. Mostly as an if I have to stay here kind of option. Awesome gig. Just not preferred for a few reasons.

Thank you for whatever help you guys can offer. If you'd rather talk some other way just let me know and I'll get you some private contact info.
Don’t necessarily believe #2. I had a friend fail out of VT-27 and was flying for the California Army National Guard about a year later. Admittedly, he was a Warrant Officer, but he flew for the guard for years. Also, I think I read here on AW that a Marine was dumped from advanced (jets) and ended up flying for the Air Guard, F-16’s or something like that - others here would know more.
 

DanMa1156

Land of the Milk and Honey.
pilot
Contributor
#3
Do you have any commitment as an officer in the Navy? - If yes, expect to serve it.
Have you had your POCR board yet? If no, expect to have to do that - you'll be redesignated to something in the Navy unless in the off chance all active O-1 billets are filled across the board for anything you're remotely qualified for as an Unrestricted Line Officer.
 

Griz882

Well-Known Member
pilot
#4
Do you have any commitment as an officer in the Navy? - If yes, expect to serve it.
Have you had your POCR board yet? If no, expect to have to do that - you'll be redesignated to something in the Navy unless in the off chance all active O-1 billets are filled across the board for anything you're remotely qualified for as an Unrestricted Line Officer.
A good point that I forgot to consider.
 

wink

VS NFO. Blue and Gold Off. Former Recruiter.
None
Super Moderator
Contributor
#6
I didn't think attiring out of API counted as having attended and failed to complete another DOD flight training program. When I was a recruiter a million years ago, we only took note of someone actually being in a training squadron like a VT.
 

Gatordev

Well-Known Member
pilot
Site Admin
Contributor
#7
No committment required, and I've been given the choice to go to a POCR board or just be discharged. Honorably.
Are you sure? When you commissioned, you signed up for 8 years. Everyone does, they just don't realize it. @Dama1156 is probably smarter on this, but the question is does your IRR time count "against" you when trying to go to another service. I'm under the impression it doesn't, historically.
 

RUFiO181

Making Recruiting Great Again
#8
Are you sure? When you commissioned, you signed up for 8 years. Everyone does, they just don't realize it. @Dama1156 is probably smarter on this, but the question is does your IRR time count "against" you when trying to go to another service. I'm under the impression it doesn't, historically.
In the service agreement it states:

"f. I understand that the Chief of Naval Personnel will determine, should I be disenrolled from flight training after commissioning but prior to designation as a Aviation Officer, whether or not I continue on active duty."

There's been a few people on here who have fallen from the training pipeline. They all go through a POCR board and many are redesignated to 1305 and sent home. There was a kid on here about 2-3 months ago who went through the same process and wanted to fly for another branch. I don't know if it was successful, but at the very least he received an approved conditional release from the Navy and allowed to apply with the Guard (I believe).
 

RUFiO181

Making Recruiting Great Again
#9
To be clear, my goals in order from most wanted and least attainable to least wanted are:
1. Getting bak into Naval Aviation. Willing to do whatever, go wherever, speak to whoever.
2. Fly for another branch. Army tops that list. Contacted my congressman, visited Army Flight School, made tons of phone calls. I've been told both I need a waiver since I attended another DOD sourced flight school, and have been told it isn't possible
3. NFO
4. USMC ground officer. If I can't serve from the sky, i'd want to get back as close to the ground as possible.
5. Army officer. Same reasons.
6. Navy EOD. Mostly as an if I have to stay here kind of option. Awesome gig. Just not preferred for a few reasons.
Scratch 1, 3, and 6. You are most likely (key word likely) going to be sent home and redesignated as a 1305.
 

wink

VS NFO. Blue and Gold Off. Former Recruiter.
None
Super Moderator
Contributor
#10
@Gatordev is right. The Navy decides if you stay on active duty. But the contract says you WILL serve at least 8 years in some capacity, even if inactive reserve. While that means you can grow your hair long and blimp out, it can affect your options to transfer to another branch. That's why they are asking. You may not have an active duty obligation, but you DO have some sort of military obligation.
 
#11
Are you sure? When you commissioned, you signed up for 8 years. Everyone does, they just don't realize it. @Dama1156 is probably smarter on this, but the question is does your IRR time count "against" you when trying to go to another service. I'm under the impression it doesn't, historically.
That might be the case I should get some clarification on that but
In the service agreement it states:

"f. I understand that the Chief of Naval Personnel will determine, should I be disenrolled from flight training after commissioning but prior to designation as a Aviation Officer, whether or not I continue on active duty."

There's been a few people on here who have fallen from the training pipeline. They all go through a POCR board and many are redesignated to 1305 and sent home. There was a kid on here about 2-3 months ago who went through the same process and wanted to fly for another branch. I don't know if it was successful, but at the very least he received an approved conditional release from the Navy and allowed to apply with the Guard (I believe).

Just looked him up. He was an O-3 in the USMC being conditionally released for flight. My biggest hurdle is that I don't have his clean record. Having attrited from a DOD sourced flight school I have to submit an exception to policy to be allowed into Army flight school. I need to convince them I'm worth rolling the dice on.
 
#12
Are you sure? When you commissioned, you signed up for 8 years. Everyone does, they just don't realize it. @Dama1156 is probably smarter on this, but the question is does your IRR time count "against" you when trying to go to another service. I'm under the impression it doesn't, historically.
Just got some clarification on this and yes I will be on the IRR but it will not prevent me from applying to a different branch. I assumed since i'll be receiving a dd214 I'll be free and clear from the military but forgot all that is is just a release from active duty. Reservists get it even when they finished their boot camp and A-school but still have a service requirement in the reserves.
 

Gatordev

Well-Known Member
pilot
Site Admin
Contributor
#13
In the service agreement it states:

"f. I understand that the Chief of Naval Personnel will determine, should I be disenrolled from flight training after commissioning but prior to designation as a Aviation Officer, whether or not I continue on active duty."

There's been a few people on here who have fallen from the training pipeline. They all go through a POCR board and many are redesignated to 1305 and sent home. There was a kid on here about 2-3 months ago who went through the same process and wanted to fly for another branch. I don't know if it was successful, but at the very least he received an approved conditional release from the Navy and allowed to apply with the Guard (I believe).
I wasn't asking if people get released with no commitment, that obviously happens. I was asking if that was the case for the OP. As he stated it is, but it's important to know and it can't be assumed.

Reservists get it even when they finished their boot camp and A-school but still have a service requirement in the reserves.
They also get it every time they come off extended orders. Good on you for doing some research. I just wanted to make sure you knew to ask the question.
 
#14
Just got some clarification on this and yes I will be on the IRR but it will not prevent me from applying to a different branch. I assumed since i'll be receiving a dd214 I'll be free and clear from the military but forgot all that is is just a release from active duty.
After a certain amount of time in the IRR you'll have to go through MEPS again for medical screening to transfer services or go to SELRES/AD status. That'll be something to keep in mind/let other branches know as you go through the service transfer/application process.
 
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