How to get around MEPS

Discussion in 'Navy OCS' started by sandiegohoov, Jun 30, 2006.

  1. sandiegohoov

    sandiegohoov Registered User None

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    So you've made it through the majority of the application process. You application is finished, you finally got in touch with that roommate you lived with 7 years ago to finish off the EPSQ, all of your letters of recommendations made you look like the second coming, your transcripts are flawless and your ASTB scores were competitive. The only problem you have right now is medical. MEPS won't see you because of one medical reason or another and your recruiter seems to have tried everything, and still nothing works. How do you get seen by medical if you can't even get in the door? You condition(s) may not be disqualifying but MEPS is screwing up the process. How do you proceed?

    If this sounds like something you're going through right now, don't worry there's light at the end of the tunnel. First it's good to understand how the medical process works.

    MEPS (military entrance processing station) is an Army run facility. They work with all the military services to get anybody and everybody in the military. Academy types go through DODMERB, everybody else goes through MEPS. They are the canned medical examiner, which means when you are either medically qualified or disqualified that paperwork STILL needs to go through Navy's BUMED for an additional medical clearance. Why is this important? MEPS could potentially disqualify you from service, BUT the Navy may qualify you if they feel you're within BUMED's guidelines of capability to serve. The flip side of that, BUMED may also disqualify you for certain communities, such as aviation, if your MEPS medical screen didn't go so good. Typically what happens is BUMED disqualifies you from said program pending additional supporting documents or appointments. Clear as mud?

    Here's the scenario, you're finished with your package, you need to go to MEPS but they're not allowing you to physical because your medical background is checkered with broken bones, asthmatic conditions that didn't extend past your 13th birthday, and that minor surgery you had when you were a kid. You couldn't get any of your paperwork from your Docs because it was such a long time ago, but you walked away from the last civilian physical with a clean bill of health, so what now? You need to talk to you recruiter about putting you in CHCS mini-reg. What you'll do then is go to a medical facility with your necessary medical documents (DD 2801/2), and your recruiter will have to walk you around the facility to get everything you need. This can best be accomplished on a reserve weekend at any military facility that gives out military physicals. Your recruiter cannot, I repeat cannot, submit your names to CHCS, it's limited to specific medical personnel. Your recruiter needs to have a good contact at a medical facility to make this happen. This is not illegal or against Navy policy. This is the same thing that happens with MEPS, but you're doing it with the Navy vice the Army.

    Let me make this clear, please do not go around MEPS unless you have to. This method of obtaining a medical exam should not be used in lieu of a MEPS physical. It takes time away from your recruiter, Navy medical staff, and most importantly YOU. So only suggest this to your recruiter if you meet the above criteria.

    Although this works, you may still have some problems. If your NPQ'd from MEPS, good chances are you'll be NPQ'd from this physical as well, so don't think you'll slip by the Docs; that's not the point. The point is to get around the MEPS foregoing all the hassles you've already faced trying to get your physical.

    When doing this if your recruiter is not familiar with the process, he or she needs to make sure they understand what is needed for a COMMISSIONING PHYSICAL. Here are the basics: Blood work (HIV, cholesterol, HEPATITIS, sugar levels, etc.), urinalysis (creatine, protein, etc), pregnancy test for females, eyes, vision, ears, sound, anthro’s for aviation, height, weight, DENTAL, and I think that's about it. Lastly, the signatures for the Doc at the end - you need to make sure he/she signs off on everything, dental if he/she can.

    Finally, your recruiter needs to go back to get the lab results from your urinalysis and your blood work. This will finish off your medical documentation. Be advised you still may have to go back to the facility to get things you may have missed in the process that's required by BUMED. This is what happens when you skirt the MEPS system, but it's better than waiting around for something that won't happen.

    If you're prior enlisted you should've received an end of enlistment physical. That physical is good for 2 years. So you can use that in lieu of a MEPS physical. ALSO, if you're a Reservist in the IRR, or a drilling Reservist, you can get a commissioning physical by yourself, without the help of your recruiter. YOU DON'T NEED TO GO TO MEPS!!

    Again, please use this only when necessary. I hope this serves you well in obtaining your physical, on your path to receiving your commission in the US Navy. If your recruiter has any questions regarding this post please have them contact me at zachary.guerra@navy.mil. Good luck.

    Please visit my other posts on Naval Aviation at:
    http://www.airwarriors.com/forum/showthread.php?p=231005#post231005
  2. wink

    wink VS NFO. Blue and Gold Off. Former Recruiter. None

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    Great post. I too would like to highlight that this procedure is to be used in extremis. It is, however, an option if necessary. Because it takes extra work on the part of the recruiter don't be insisting he help you with this procedure if you are a cancer survivor, are missing fingers, or are told you are NPQ from the get go. The juvenile asthma example given is a good one. Trust your recruiter if he says this option isn't for you. His job is to put people in the Navy. He wants you to make it. If he discourages you then take it as a hint.
  3. XeroCool

    XeroCool Registered User

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    Can anyone explain this dental to me? I have bad teeth and many cavities, all with fillings in them. The reason being, as I have researched, that my father was stationed in Korea while I was in the important years for receiving fluoride via the water. Is this something that could X me or is this something that they just need to make sure that my fillings are all pressurized?
    X
  4. youearnedit

    youearnedit Registered User

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    Prior Enlisted/ Going Officer

    sandiegohoov has provided this site with priceless information about going around MEPS. Here's the deal. If you are prior enlisted make sure you stay in IRR. This keeps you in the military. If you are still in IRR you can wear your uniform and go get a physical from a Navy base. I just did this because MEPS refused to see me. And THANK GOD I'm still IRR because showing up in uniform in a familiar environment (on base) is 1,000 times better than begging MEPS to see you. Just remember to be extra nice to those doing your paperwork because its not something they do everyday or are required to do. Also, remember you are attached to an IRR command that exists to help you out. If you're prior service DO NOT TAKE NO FOR AN ANSWER...remember that you did four years so you deserve the respect.
  5. thenuge

    thenuge Cleverly disguised as a responsible adult

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    I am getting my package together right now. I'll just make this quik.

    Here is my situation:
    5 years enlisted
    I had an ACL reconstruction in 2000 in Yokosuka while on active duty.
    I was cleared by medical for the remainder of my time and had several flight deck physicals. I passed and I worked 'till my honorable discharge in '04.
    I would have been allowed to reenlist had I chosen to do so.
    Upon my discharge I was awarded 30% disability for the knee.
    I am on IRR 'til 20 JAN 2007.
    My knee works like a charm and I am more active than I have ever been.

    Right now I am in Nashville. Should I go down to Millington ASAP and my get my medical screening taken care of? My selection officer said I am good to go but I will need a waiver. When I go down to the base for my screening
    (since I am IRR) Do I need my active duty medical record? That got sent off to the "warehouse" when I got out.

    What would be my best course of action here?

    Great info by the way, thank you
  6. youearnedit

    youearnedit Registered User

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    Irr

    thenuge, I would say that the medical department will get your files transfered there if they need them. There was a bit of a problem showing up with NO FILES. They had nowhere to put my results but they started one for me. I am 10% disabled and I brought my VA claim paperwork with me. I go for my follow up with the doc on the 5th, where he will clear me or not. Remember, they have to take blood, so the Doc can't clear you until your blood comes back.
  7. thenuge

    thenuge Cleverly disguised as a responsible adult

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    ok, I just called an officer recruiter from Colorado for a different perspective on my knee. He said that since my last physical was less than 5 years ago, the physical is still good, and I don't even need to go to MEPS or anywhere for that matter! He said that physical would stand for re entry...
  8. Brett327

    Brett327 Magnum! None

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    How about a Haiku for that one?

    Brett
  9. thenuge

    thenuge Cleverly disguised as a responsible adult

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    Did you like that?
  10. Brett327

    Brett327 Magnum! None

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    Indeed. Nothing says "I care" (or fvck off) like an unexpected Haiku. It's a very versatile form of expression. :D

    Brett
  11. NavyChaz

    NavyChaz Registered User

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    Thanks again to SanDiegoHoov... he really has helped out with a lot of good information on this site. Another thing that I put in here a couple of months ago for anyone looking for help with their application package. There's a good guide on navyguides.com - walks you through the process and it really helped me get all my stuff together and tells you clearly what to do and what to avoid. My recruiter was really pleased with my package - it was complete and didn't take me very long to get together. Check it out.

    I've heard all kinds of different things about MEPS and what they require. But you guys are right - I've heard from a lot of people that if you're prior enlisted it's best to stay IRR rather than dealing with MEPS and do be nice to all the paperwork people - it will save a lot of stress.
  12. akdorsey

    akdorsey You got a problem with me?

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    Do they check for childhood asthma and when you go for MEPS do you take your medical records with you or do they get them from EVERY doctor you have ever been to?
  13. wink

    wink VS NFO. Blue and Gold Off. Former Recruiter. None

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    You don't take your medical records with you unless your recruiter has identified something in your medical history that he knows might be an issue. Then he may have you bring some records. Usually, you go through the physical and the Doc will tell you if he has a problem with anything and ask for specific documentation for later review. They don't "check" for childhood asthma. If it was childhood asthma then it stands to reason it isn't a problem for anyone in adulthood so there is nothing to check. The forms you fill out will ask about asthma. Be honest but very precise. How long ago was the last attack, how sever, how frequent were they, was medication required, if so what kind. Childhood asthma usually is not a problem. Be very specific though, it may prevent you having to go to a specialist for tests and get a consult and request a waiver. Some people were told by their parents they had childhood asthma but don't remember a single attack themselves.
  14. akdorsey

    akdorsey You got a problem with me?

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    Well my doctor told me that I had childhood asthma and gave me medicine but I never seen a sign of asthma. The only thing that came close is when I get around cats or dogs or like zoo animals then I get short of breathe and start sneezing but I think that allegeries.

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