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NEWS General Aviation goodness - Light Sport Aircraft rules change coming

Swanee

Self aware since 2014
pilot
Contributor
#16
Why are you guys all excited about this? Honest question. This sounds terrible...why would we want minimally experienced guys out there with bigger equipment? I mean, I guess a mid-air is a mid-air, if they're 1,000 pounds or 3,000 pounds, but I don't understand why more LSA is good?
Because general aviation is being regulated into extinction. This is a way to undo that.
 

Griz882

Well-Known Member
pilot
#17
Ultimately the goal is more activity / growth. It gets safe growth in a population of pilots that can fly Day VFR without a medical (away from B/C airspace). Not a bad thing. The original intent was to provide a cheaper pathway to flying - with reduced pilot training requirements of teh Sport and Recreational pilot certificates - but that never panned out.

As @RedFive pointed out, the lighter aircraft with lighter control forces are more difficult to fly and are more accident prone especially close to the ground. A 3600 pound C-206 absent of managing the engine is easier / easiest to fly.

A new Cessna 172 is north of $400K. We need a pipeline of non Part-23 certified aircraft that people can fly easily for someone who is a educated working professional and has a passion for aviation. Increasingly flying is a well off dude's activity.
I also think you need to look at this from a slightly different perspective. Most young people don’t jump into LSA’s they don’t need to and with Basic Med they may never need to. Most LSA guys I know have well over 1500 hours but either don’t want the hassle of the (mostly unnecessary)3rd Class Medical, or simply want to enjoy simple flying. With the right endorsements I can fly my 1250 pound, 100 hp LSA into Class B or almost any airport in the US...as long as it is under VFR conditions. For example, you can find me weaving through the DC FRZ avoiding Quantico, Andrews, Reagan, and Dulles (all the the while having a blast) almost every weekend.

But...the LSA weight is based on nothing scientific. It is simply a number some guy at the FAA dreamed up. In Europe the LSA-like rules allow for a bit more weight and a host of more complex options to include retractable gear, CS props, and even helicopters. The ability to fly a little faster or something more stable on windy days is a nice option. I am looking forward to the pending rules change if only, as someone else wrote, it makes the FAA more of an advocate organization rather than an enforcement group.
 

Jim123

DD-214 in hand and I'm gonna party like it's 1998
pilot
#18
But...the LSA weight is based on nothing scientific. It is simply a number some guy at the FAA dreamed up. In Europe the LSA-like rules allow for a bit more weight and a host of more complex options to include retractable gear, CS props, and even helicopters. The ability to fly a little faster or something more stable on windy days is a nice option. I am looking forward to the pending rules change if only, as someone else wrote, it makes the FAA more of an advocate organization rather than an enforcement group.
Yep- for @RedFive, the current Light Sport Aircraft rules were meant in part to cover the so-called "heavy ultralights," that is many two seat ultralights that were too heavy (and one too many seats) for Part 103 rules but weren't necessarily registered with an N-number. A lot of people had sort of looked the other way, because of the safety benefit of a two seat trainer, and the fact that those airplanes weren't really capable of going anywhere so they weren't really a problem. (Think of it more like provide a path to legal citizenship, ha ha.)

The other end of the LSA spectrum is a basic two-seat, 100~ish knot, day VFR runabout. The LSA rule was intended to help revitalize general aviation by offering something that was much lower cost but still capable. The problem is the current weight limit limits capability a little too much.

A lot of the heartache with the current LSA rules, if you want to point to a good example, is that the Cessna 150/152 is ineligible by being about 300 pounds too heavy. That says a lot about the weight limit. Of course every airplane is a compromise of many conflicting goals, and when you're limited to a 1320lb max gross weight then you have to choose between payload or structure- pick one or the other. That's not to say that the modern crop of LSAs are flimsy, but they're not built for decades of abuse like an old 152 and they handle and fly like very light airplanes.. Now, a substantial part of the general aviation demographic is, to put it bluntly, "fat old guys," and that's their own fault for eating into their payload (a pun!). But putting aside their dietary and exercise habits, these are some pretty valid reasons for revising the LSA max gross weight limit.

Food for thought and it's just one side of the argument. The opposite side of the argument is... well, there isn't much to the other side. The original LSA rule was a step in the right direction and it was also a very good step and a big step, but if it's a bit bigger step then it will be great.
 

wink

VS NFO. Blue and Gold Off. Former Recruiter.
None
Super Moderator
Contributor
#19
New LSAs may be sexy but they are still expensive, far more than was hoped when the LSA rules were being debated. In my estimation one of the best applications of LSA is bringing in prevously certified aircraft that meet the requirements. They are usually classic and affordable. Taylorcraft, Luscombe, Cessna 120/140, Ercoupe, and many more. These changes will bring in lots of current legacy certified aircraft which will help keeps things afordable.
 

ChuckMK23

Former H-46 Driver
pilot
#20
On a GA subject - should I stick with old reliable DC green headset (paid for, it works, reliable) or spring for the Bose A20 ($1,000, NR, cool, bluetooth)

What say you GA AW's?
 

Jim123

DD-214 in hand and I'm gonna party like it's 1998
pilot
#21
Pretty happy with my Claritys for GA use ($700 for the nice version)- very light weight. Sticking foam in my ears protected my hearing for 5000 hours in the Navy so far...

They broke once but the manufacturer fixed the problem for free, so there's that.
 

wink

VS NFO. Blue and Gold Off. Former Recruiter.
None
Super Moderator
Contributor
#22
The Bose are huge. I have the on ear Dave Clark NR. Fold up nice and compact. Work well in 737. Used just once in my Cessna. I thought they were fine but really only brought them along for the bluetooth tunes.
 

huggyu2

Well-Known Member
None
#23
If you are happy with the DC's and they offer you adequate hearing protection, stick with them. However, if you find them uncomfortable after 30 minutes; need better hearing protection; or really want the bluetooth, you should upgrade.

In my case, I have old Bose X's and love them. Comfortable and quiet.
When they die, I'm buying A20's.
 

Griz882

Well-Known Member
pilot
#24
I like the Bose A20 but I got a set at pretty low cost in a local auction. Now I’m spoiled. They are better and more comfortable than the DC, which are nevertheless very good, just not as comfortable or quiet.
 

RedFive

Well-Known Member
pilot
Contributor
#25
Some of my Jet Blue buddies were talking about using https://uflymike.com to convert their non-aviation Bose headphones, which would allow them to use it in the cockpit for flying, or take the boom off when non-reving, thereby only having to pack one set. *shrug*....airline problems.
 

scoolbubba

Well-Known Member
pilot
Contributor
#26
On a GA subject - should I stick with old reliable DC green headset (paid for, it works, reliable) or spring for the Bose A20 ($1,000, NR, cool, bluetooth)

What say you GA AW's?
My A20s are the shit, but they are fucking ginormous. When I’m not a commuter anymore it won’t matter nearly as much.

They do take a noisy 73 cockpit to nearly silent, and being able to jam out to the foo fighters drowns out the sounds of a near-retiree chewing on his pretzels.
 

scoolbubba

Well-Known Member
pilot
Contributor
#29
Hey captain,

I’m gonna need you to put your iphone back in the holster and get off AW. We’re two prior to push and you haven’t done a flow, checklist, or brief. Stop hitting on the FAs so we can get off the gate on time so I might have a shot at making my commute home!

#FOproblems
 
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