Fuzzy Bunny...?

Discussion in 'War Zone' started by Recovering LSO, Feb 20, 2012.

  1. Recovering LSO

    Recovering LSO Suck Less None

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    http://www.navytimes.com/news/2012/02/navy-carrier-enterprise-retools-mental-health-afloat-022012w/

    Couple of thoughts come to mind:

    1. Really?

    2. Is an onslaught of visits to the psych office during the final phases of workups abnormal? Thought people trying to get our cruise was pretty standard.

    3. Really?
     
  2. ea6bflyr

    ea6bflyr Working Class Bum None

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    I think the motto "It's okay to be crazy!" is probably better than "Fuzzy Bunny".

    -ea6bflyr ;)
     
  3. jmcquate

    jmcquate Well-Known Member

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    There was only one catch and that was Catch-22, which specified that a concern for one's safety in the face of dangers that were real and immediate was the process of a rational mind. Orr was crazy and could be grounded. All he had to do was ask; and as soon as he did, he would no longer be crazy and would have to fly more missions. Orr would be crazy to fly more missions and sane if he didn't, but if he were sane he had to fly them. If he flew them he was crazy and didn't have to; but if he didn't want to he was sane and had to. Yossarian was moved very deeply by the absolute simplicity of this clause of Catch-22 and let out a respectful whistle.
     
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  4. KBayDog

    KBayDog Well-Known Member

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    I don't have a problem with addressing mental health concerns before they become a problem. I suspect (hope?) Fuzzy Bunny's appointment book is going to get full quicker than any of us wants to admit. The article even hints at "why" it's going to get worse:

    Sorry, this "old habit" ain't going to change any time soon. In fact, it's going to get a hell of a lot worse, and the equation is pretty simple: Less Sailors + More Work = Greater Mental Health Issues (and/or Lower Retention)

    We're entering a very dangerous period. Our equipment is old, tired, and in serious need of TLC after a decade of war - and this is ignoring the fact that our equipment was old, tired, and in serious need of TLC long before our current wars. To replace this gear, we've hedged our bets on a few programs that are (stop the presses) long overdue and well over budget. "And oh, by the way" we just decided that we're broke, and some of those programs are getting axed. So, in a nut shell, we're not much better off than we were on 9/10/01. As one of my well-seasoned CWOs in maintenance tried to tell Ops time and again, "You need to give these aircraft a "Maintenance Day" every now and then. If you don't, the aircraft are going to give themselves a "Maintenance Day," and Murphy usually dictates that it'll be when you can least afford it." Seeing as our workload (on the USN/USMC side) is showing no signs of waning, we're going to continue to run our fleet into the ground...and they're going to continue to take their own "Maintenance Days." (This is good if you like extended Beer on the Pier stops at Jebel or Bahrain, but not so good if you like maintaining a maritime presence.

    Our Sailors and Marines are no different than the supposedly inanimate objects we sail them on. We're "rightsizing"...I get it. It should be no surprise, then, that we're also "upsizing" the workload of those who stick around. Our career Sailors and Marines who have been around for a while are tired, but those who stay are doing so because they're willing to endure what we ask of 'em. God bless them. However, many of them are feeling the stresses of this "rightsizing," not only through increased workload, but through wondering if they're going to have a job when they get back. Many who joined prior to or shortly after 9/11/01 are being shown the door at the midpoint (or later) of their careers. Some will say, "Tough shit - they should have had 'sustained superior performance', so this is their own doing," but our promotion/retention system isn't exactly that black-and-white (another discussion for another day). The bottom line is that we cannot stick our heads in the sand and assume that everything is hunky-dory with our career Sailors and Marines as we begin to trim our numbers.

    ***Blasphemy Alert*** This may come as a shock to some (especially a few on this board), but not every Sailor and Marine is a Kool-Aid drinker. Yes, they are all volunteers, but not every one enlists or accepts a commission with the goal of staying in for 40 and becoming CNO/CMC/MCPON/SMMC/etc. Some join for a little adventure, while some join to get away from home. Some join for college money, while some to support their families. Some join to fly, while some join to gain a resume bullet. The reasons are endless, but we cannot ignore the fact that every Sailor and Marine has his/her own motives...and most are not affected by our Kool-Aid. If you look at our recruiting efforts, we this is something we've brought upon ourselves (i.e., college money, "Not Just a Job...An Adventure," etc.) These are the Sailors and Marines we need to be looking out for. While our boats, planes, and careerists may have no overt problems with "routine" 10-12 month deployments (with the obligatory workups, early deployments, endless extensions, etc.), blood money for back-to-back sea tours, and so on, the Sailors and Marines who volunteer and serve honorably...but are not "True Believers"...are going to have a tough time handling all that we ask of them.

    If employing psychologists and/or chaplains help our Sailors and Marines maintain some semblance of mental health during months at sea (especially as they absorb the workload left by those who were "rightsized" out), back-to-back-to-back deployments, etc., it is money well spent. We ask the world of them - a way to vent where they won't have to worry about ending their careers (*cough* Facebook *cough*) and get professional "Preventative Maintenance" is the least we could do. We have an obligation, when their service is over, to send them back home better than we received them. We owe it to them, and we owe it to their families and friends.

    Finally, we love to discuss at our various PME sessions about how important the "human element" is in war. It is time that we put our money where our collective mouth is.
     
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  5. Recovering LSO

    Recovering LSO Suck Less None

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    my sarcasm was directed at the name "fuzzy bunny" - not the effort.
     
  6. MasterBates

    MasterBates Well-Known Member

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    Kbay. Best. Post. Ever.

    Sent from my BlackBerry 9850 using Tapatalk
     
  7. KBayDog

    KBayDog Well-Known Member

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    No worries - understood. I'm just applauding the effort...even if it is two and a half centuries too late.
     
  8. Swanee

    Swanee Samsonite?! I was way off! None

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    I've always felt that mental health is something that has been lacking in the military. How much PTSD-esc troubles would we not have if there was someone who could we could talk to? Maybe you are fine- but maybe your fellow Marine or Sailor has a wife that is dealing with some serious depression; but they can't be at home to help with it. Instead they are working their ass off fixing your jet, or flying on your wing or as your copilot. But they aren't 100% there because they are worried about what's going on at home as well as a million other things that is happening at work. But you don't know that because your world is okay. Then a mishap happens and we wonder what we could have done differently. Maybe all that Sailor or Marine needed was someone to talk to who had experience dealing with mental health. If 10 people abuse it but 1 person needs it, it is worth it.
     
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  9. SynixMan

    SynixMan Every day I'm chop, chopperin... None

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    We had a Chaplin in Corpus who made himself visible in the student ready rooms for no reason in particular, just to be visible to us and remind us he's around for more than our check in briefing. I know people who pulled him aside discreetly after he'd leave to talk. Mental health is no joke, and as much as many of us take pride in our toughness and fortitude, everyone needs to talk and vent. It could be to your wardroom buddies, your wife, family, Chaps, or the Doc on Big E.

    Good on the Doc for working with his people. All this serious stuff aside, Fuzzy Bunny is an odd name, no doubt.
     
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  10. CommodoreMid

    CommodoreMid Whateva! I do what I want! None

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    Definitely applaud the Enterprise in making efforts to take away the stigma against seeking help for mental health issues. While the "Fuzzy Bunny" thing is retarded and I don't think we need to treat our Sailors like kids who need sock puppets to express their feelings, there is still a suck it up mindset in the military. While we're getting a lot better at fighting it, it seems we're only focusing on things like combat-related PTSD as being "legitimate" reasons to need mental health support. At any point in any of our lives, there probably will be something that happens to us or some other stressor that makes therapy a damn good option. You can be the toughest person with the best ability to compartmentalize, but at some point you can't do it alone. Every person's threshold for what that is may be different, but we shouldn't judge people as weak for that. If the Navy can create an environment that allows people to blow off some steam by talking to the "Fuzzy Bunny" for a couple sessions without prejudice, and that lets them continue to serve well, then what alternative is there?
     
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  11. scoolbubba

    scoolbubba Well-Known Member None

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    I take my mental health breaks in 12 oz increments, like all self loathing irish catholics full of guilt are supposed to.
     
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  12. GroundPounder

    GroundPounder Active Member

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    Catholics are supposed to drink Jameson*, surely you must mean 3 oz increments?

    * However, the current Pope has authorized Jager bombs where appropriate.
     
  13. phrogpilot73

    phrogpilot73 Well-Known Member

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    Irish Catholics are also authorized Guinness, I believe.
     
  14. scoolbubba

    scoolbubba Well-Known Member None

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    I thought about that, and saying I take my mental health breaks in 4 finger increments didn't sound quite right.
     
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  15. Alpha_Echo_606

    Alpha_Echo_606 Unknown Member™

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    I've always heard it as 3 fingers of medicine, and I always practice it every morning when I get home from work. :cool:
     
  16. robav8r

    robav8r . . . just a thought from a worn out arm chair. None

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    Like this . . .

    http://www.public.navy.mil/bupers-npc/reference/messages/Documents/NAVADMINS/NAV2012/NAV12043.txt
     

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