Could use some running advice.

Discussion in 'PFT' started by Flying Toaster, Mar 10, 2009.

  1. Flying Toaster

    Flying Toaster Active Member None

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    I had been holding off on running hard until I had gotten over 20 pullups, and 100 crunches since it's always been hard for me to develop upper body strength (hockey goalie for many years, which just works your legs). I'm now comfortably over 20 and 100, so now it's time to work on getting down the run time. I had still been doing some light running (3 miles twice a week at more of a jogging pace) in the mean time so I'm not exactly at ground zero, but pretty close. Just for reference my last 3 mile time was around 26 minutes, of course I was just cruising and it was done on some rather large hills (refer to below description).

    Here are my questions-

    I live on a pretty large hill (800ft elevation), every direction I go is downhill with at least a 10-25 (yes it is actually 25 in spots) degree grade for 3/4 mile+ in each direction and then it has the tendency to go uphill again in alot of spots. Meaning no matter what I am finishing up a steep hill. Is it good to run big hills like this, or is putting to much strain on my body? Should I run on the local gravel track instead?

    Is running on the road (asphalt) bad for you?

    Any advice for someone just starting out to avoid injurys/shin splints/etc. in the long run?

    Diet? I have a crazy metabolism, so everytime I start running hard I lose weight. That is despite taking in alot of calories to begin with, so I can only assume I'm eating the wrong stuff.

    Whats the verdict on trail running? When the snow clears I have miles of dirt trails around my house.

    I'm applying for 2010, so I have a year or more. Obviously my long term goal is sub 18 when I head off to OCS, but my more short term goal is to get around a 21 for my intial PFT, which looks like it will be 3-4 months (leaving me with a 282). Don't let the 26 baseline throw you off though, I would estimate pushing on a track it would be more like a 24.

    I've looked most of this stuff up, but it's always nice to have first hand advice based on your constraints.

    Thanks in advance,

    Mike
     
  2. phrogdriver

    phrogdriver liberty risk None

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    You will do both road runs and trail runs at OCS, so do both.

    Hills are great training, but you shouldn't do them exclusively. I recommend doing trails, but it's hard to estimate your pace on them. Doing too much of ANYTHING will eventually get you injured, and road running is no exception, but it's not intrinsically bad. I recommend doing all three, periodically checking your progress on a track or measured course.
     
  3. teabag53

    teabag53 Registered User None

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    Don't focus on training for the PFT. Instead, focus on being fit in all areas. My advice is to get used to running for periods of greater than 45 minutes without stopping. Your speed will pick up and soon enough you will find yourself covering a lot of ground in a hour. This doesn't gaurauntee 6 minute miles but WILL be more than adequate to get a respectable run score on the PFT AND will build your endurance for OCS and TBS. If you're hellbent on a 300 PFT, work in some shorter, high intensity runs. Remember, the PFT happens twice a year but endurance will be required on a daily basis. I am not a personal trainer but I did this and ran perfect scores (in my younger years).
     
  4. manlypat

    manlypat yawn

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    Running on pavement

    I've been told that running for long periods or repeatedly on pavement is pretty hard on your legs.

    Below I mostly quote from http://saveyourself.ca/articles/running.php,

    Not only is the stress of impact exaggerated by the hard surface, but it is also repeated excessively because the mechanics of every step are exactly the same.

    Unyielding concrete and asphalt pose a number of difficulties for the runner’s anatomy, but none so great as the threat of shin splints: compartment syndrome, periostalgia, and stress fractures are the three conditions that typically cause shin pain. (Shin splints is not actually diagnostically meaningful: “shin splints” simple means “shin pain.”) All three can be show-stoppers. All three are caused or severely aggravated by running on a hard surface.

    Ideally, everyone should run “cross-country.” Your run should be on soft, constantly changing and unstable surfaces.
     
    MrsPickle likes this.
  5. exhelodrvr

    exhelodrvr Active Member None

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    Figure out your goal (make it a realistic one!)

    Here is a suggested 5K training schedule to use as a guideline - you can see that the basic idea is to do a combination of slower distance work, "sprint" workouts, and rest days. Hills are part of this.

    http://www.coolrunning.com/engine/2/2_4/142.shtml

    That general theory WILL work (whether you follow the schedule in the link, or come up with your own version), just be realistic with your goals, and don't wait too long too start the program.
     
  6. sciguy

    sciguy Pro-Rec Supply

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    Great work on the pullups I can only get about 3 in at a time right now.

    I am closing in on 30 miles each week, my focus has been on running. I go to the gym every other day and use the treadmill. I walk 2-3 miles, run 1.5 -2 miles, walk 2-3 miles, lift weights and then finish with walking around 2 miles. As a bigger guy, I didn't want to risk hurting my knees early on by running on pavement. I occasionally go for long walks around town now. I don't have many hills around where I live, but I don't see how they would hurt you.

    Start slow, fast walk 2 or 3 miles at a time and build your endurance up before you start increasing your speed. This isn't something you want to rush, or you will hurt yourself. I find that I lose about a pound for every two miles I run/walk, but that is just me. As long as I avoid restaurants, I can eat just about whatever I want. I try to eat more meat than I used to though. I work my legs out with weights that focus on my hamstrings and calves in between walks.

    Hope this helps
     
  7. GO_AV8_DevilDog

    GO_AV8_DevilDog Round 2...

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    Lately running has been a pain in the ass for me (7 degree temp's with ice and snow on the ground) so I've been limited to running on my schools crappy indoor track (9:1mile). This Is what I've done.
    Started just running 3 miles NO LESS get the body used to it. At first I would have to walk some portions of a lap but I made it a point never to walk a full lap at a time this alone took me from a 34 minute bag of ass to 26 minutes (still not great). I then started to work in paced runs. Do a walk a lap, then a paced lap (bout 45 seconds a lap, equals a 7 minute mile) then a cool off lap for the length of a mile building from there.

    I ended up with some pretty nasty shin splints bout last week old shoes, constant leaning to the right on the tiny track probably had something to do with it.

    So lately I've been doing some low impact things like swimming or the eliptical. Yesterday I did 3 miles on the eliptical in bout 22 minutes with a 5 minute cool down on it (bout another .5 miles)

    Basically what I've noticed and what I've gathered from my OSO is that just straight up running is not going to help as much as throwing in some sprints every other day. You got two types of muscle (slow twitch, fast twitch) you need to make sure you're working both of them.
     
  8. feddoc

    feddoc Really old guy

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    Is it good to run big hills like this, or is putting to much strain on my body?

    It can be good. Hill training done properly will do a lot to increase your speed, maybe not so much to increase your endurance. It is a technique utilized more by sprinters. However, if one were to compare two guys, one who hill trained and one who trained exclusively on flat ground...have them do the PRT, the hill trained guy would have a stronger finish.



    Should I run on the local gravel track instead?

    Do both.


    Is running on the road (asphalt) bad for you?

    Depends on the percentage of rubber/other softening agents..as in used tires..so, they will most certainly have more give to them than concrete. Dirt, cinder might be better options.


    Any advice for someone just starting out to avoid injurys/shin splints/etc. in the long run?

    Warm up, stretch and get the best professionally fitted shoes you can afford.


    Diet? I have a crazy metabolism, so everytime I start running hard I lose weight. That is despite taking in alot of calories to begin with, so I can only assume I'm eating the wrong stuff.

    Eat more. Google Nancy Clark/nutrition, she puts out good gouge for athletes.



    Whats the verdict on trail running? When the snow clears I have miles of dirt trails around my house.

    Good stuff, helps break up the boredom.
     
  9. exhelodrvr

    exhelodrvr Active Member None

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    Icing after every run will help keep shin splints at bay.

    Strongly recommend you go to a local running shoe store and have them recommend a particular type of shoe. Different people stride differently, and the shoes can help or hurt when it comes to shin splints/other leg and foot issues.
     
  10. Ryan_Cunningham

    Ryan_Cunningham VMFA None

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    Yes, hills are great for working out. I did hill sprints three times a week to train for OCS and my endurance and speed increased considerably.

    No, running on the road is not bad for you. There are people out there running >50mpw on roads and they're ok. Just make sure you have the right shoes for your feet, running style, and weight.

    To avoid shin splints, go to a running store and have them analyze your gait in order to ensure you pick the right shoes. It might cost $20 more, but aren't your feet worth it?

    Eat more. Its that simple. Try eating 6 meals a day. If you're trying to maintain muscle mass, I'd also suggest taking in 40g protein per meal and continuing to lift weights - Otherwise your body can go catabolic once you start running more often and you'll lose muscle and strength.

    Trail running - Do it. Thats mostly all you'll do at OCS. It'll strengthen your ankles and make you less prone to getting injured while running the trails. Additionally, I'd throw in some pushups, situps, bodyweight squats, etc... every half mile or so to prepare you more fully for what you'll experience in Quantico.

    Good luck.
     
  11. aukonak

    aukonak Member

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    Adding onto what others said-

    If you're afraid of losing weight, take in 1.5g of protein per pound of whatever you weigh. I used to have a terrible time gaining mass (or at least keeping even) any time I threw any cardio into my regimen. Once I upped my protein intake I started to see real results and it kept me from burning myself out. Don't neglect carbs or fat either since you need them both too.

    Ice your legs down after every run, don't run on asphalt constantly if you can help it. From someone who's had chronic shin splints, it's not worth the fear of stress fractures, believe me. If you go to a running store make sure they know your situation and get them to give you 100% of their attention. If they're trying to rush you into a pair of shoes, put on the brakes and make it clear that you're not leaving until you're sure the pair your buying is a good fit.
     
  12. nugget61

    nugget61 Active Member None

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    Threadjack: What types of running surfaces can we expect at OCS (navy & marine)?
     
  13. navy09

    navy09 Registered User None

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    I'm not sure what to think about your post, but I'm especially curious about this. Do you actually lose a pound of fat for every two miles you run (or walk)?
     
  14. sciguy

    sciguy Pro-Rec Supply

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    I had a good 25 pounds I needed to take off when I started running. I found it came off a lot faster when I increased my distance. A run will shed pounds faster yes but walking covers much farther distances. After 7-8 miles of run/walk, my average weight loss was 2-3 pounds, maybe not a pound for every two miles, closer to three. That was just a saying I put in my head to make sure I never did any distance less than 2 miles. I don't lose that kind of weight anymore.
     
  15. phrogdriver

    phrogdriver liberty risk None

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    I looked it up. Running burns about 17 calories a minute for a 180-200lb person. A pound of fat lost requires a negative calorie balance of about 3000. There is no way, other than by sweating water weight, to lose weight that quickly.
     

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