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1,001 questions about the ASTB (post your scores & ask your questions here!)

Hi Guys,

I took my OAR/ASTB this morning but I didn’t do as well as I had wanted. I was a business major in college and achieved a 3.72 GPA (Magna Cum Laude honors).

The scores I received today were 47/5/6/5...

How do you think I will stack up?
 

peppergunner

ɹǝqɯǝW pǝʇɹǝʌuI
Hi Guys,

I took my OAR/ASTB this morning but I didn’t do as well as I had wanted. I was a business major in college and achieved a 3.72 GPA (Magna Cum Laude honors).

The scores I received today were 47/5/6/5...

How do you think I will stack up?
I've seen some accepted to aviation with those scores, but retake it if you can.
 
Hey guys took the ASTB for the first time today and felt okay. Ended up with an OAR of 57 and subtest scores of 7/5/7. Taking it again in mid July and this time around I felt like I really struggled with the Performance Based Measurement Battery and the listening and tracking in particular. Anyone got any advice as to ways to improve the pilot score, through the PBMB in particular?
 

peppergunner

ɹǝqɯǝW pǝʇɹǝʌuI
Hey guys took the ASTB for the first time today and felt okay. Ended up with an OAR of 57 and subtest scores of 7/5/7. Taking it again in mid July and this time around I felt like I really struggled with the Performance Based Measurement Battery and the listening and tracking in particular. Anyone got any advice as to ways to improve the pilot score, through the PBMB in particular?
Other users have recorded their own examples of the two-tone audio to test themselves. Give that a whirl.
 
Hey everyone, this is a thank you post to this community for all the great resources. I got a 60 / 7 / 8 / 8 this morning.
First, I am a recent graduate: I have a B.A. in Psychology and Philosophy, with an overall GPA of 3.99.
This post will be about how to actually take the test since I found some differences between what I expected and what happened.

1: The math portion was awful. Why? It consisted entirely of word problems. Items such as "construction company A has a base rate of 17000 and a per mile fee of 4.50. Company B has a base rate of 34000 and a per mile fee of 4.25. What is the breakeven cost?"
Believe me I know math. However, sitting down and analyzing this problem in a noisy room (seriously, could people stop talking right outside the door?) when you are aware you are crunched for time is very different than knowing how to do it. So: practice word problems until you are sick of them. Exponents were not important. Logs were not important. DRT and rate A vs rate B were the foundation of probably half the problems. Which brings this to
2: The mechanical comprehension section was almost entirely word problems. This was VERY different than expected. There was one diagram involving pulleys, one involving gears, and an occasional other. Otherwise they were word problems. You need to have a firm understanding of why Bernoulli's effect exists, why Newton's laws are what they are, why weight is not mass. A couple of problems involved Newtons and one in particular asked for comparing a 100N object on the earth vs a 100N object on the moon. Essentially, you need to understand the principles behind the diagrams.
3: The flight knowledge section involved acronyms I have never seen but I imagine were in the FAA handbook.

For the above three, the point I am making is that to do well you have to understand what the meaning is behind the diagrams. It is not enough to memorize pictures. I expected to do better on the math section with my heavy background in statistics and also expected the math section to be more akin to the GRE. There is a trick to nearly every problem since you do not have a calculator, do not overthink any problem. A great example: one question asked what the probability of getting either heads or tails on three successive coin flips is. Sitting here, that's easy: 1/2. "either or". When you are in stressed out test mode, are you going to catch that this is asking something very different than 1/2^3?

An important note: the OAR comes first before any question about aviation. If you haven't taken the full test yet, are you aware of how demoralizing this can be? Do your best to keep in mind that every section is distinct and don't carry feelings of frustration between sections.

The compass trick did not help the UAV section. It is not fast enough. Look at the direction and think of the following "I am facing right of east. East is left of me. North is two left of me". For the same heading, if you needed to find West you would go "I am left of south. South is right of me. West is two right of me". You only need to extrapolate one or two to the left or right to find any of the parking lots with this method. I averaged about 1.4 seconds per target, missed 2, max 3.

Some notes about the throttle/joystick/dichotic listening: this is simpler than it is made out to be. Lean into the ear that is giving instructions. They will be said simultaneously and slowly. It is not a case of white noise in one ear, instructions in the other like some dichotic listening videos suggest. Make it a motor memory that either even/odd is left/right buttons. Write down the emergency instructions. Do NOT focus on the throttle target when the dual joystick/throttle section comes up. The throttle target will move slower than the joystick target, so watch the color with your peripheral vision.


Feel free to PM any questions, I'll be happy to answer. Good luck everyone.
 
For the UAV portion I missed one question because of a simple mistake but my average response time was 2-3 seconds. I actually used the compass trick, but I kept one hand on the mouse so I could quickly click the correct response. I slightly tilted the compass to the right so I could fully rotate it on every question I needed to. Hold the compass with your left hand and rotate it accordingly, use the mouse in your right hand.

Regardless of how anyone does it, best advice for the UAV portion is to aim for a response time 3 seconds or below.
 
Hey guys, I understand there are quite a few study sources on the internet as well as books you can buy. Does anyone know if the Trivium Study Guides are any good? Thanks!

V/r
 
Hi everyone, rising 1/C MIDN and aspiring SNA here. Just got my scores back for my 2nd ASTB attempt, got a 55 OAR and a 7/9/8 AQR/PFAR/FOFAR.

A few insights from this attempt I would like to share:
- As a few people above me have mentioned, the math sub-test consists mostly of word problems; calculations in this section aren't too intense but the most difficult part is reading the question and figuring out what it's trying to ask you. I studied for the math section using old copies of the official SAT and ACT guides I had laying around and it helped A LOT. I definitely recommend finding some SAT/ACT resources and using those to study for the math sub-test in addition to the ASTB books.

- I personally thought that the reading section was the most difficult out of the first three sub-tests this time around. You can expect to get lots of wordy naval documents/passages that you will have to read and obtain information from. I studied for this section and the MCT using the ASTB study guide from Accepted, Inc. (it's the one with a navy blue cover and a picture of pilot wings on the front). For this section, one thing I did that helped a lot is read the passages aloud. I can't exactly explain why or how that worked but I find it easier to comprehend passages if I listen to them in addition to reading them. I don't know if this will work for everyone but I definitely recommend giving it a shot.

- For the MCT, the biggest challenge I faced was the time limit; you only have 15 minutes to answer 30 questions pertaining to various mechanical topics. On this attempt, most of the questions I got in this section were conceptual (I think I only got 2 or 3 questions involving relatively simple physics calculations). I definitely recommend going over some basic concepts in physics such as kinetic/potential energy, Newton's 3 laws of motion, and some basic electrical stuff such as circuit diagrams and Ohm's law. There's also a PDF file called "ASTB Personal Study Guide" or something like that that's circulating the internet (I'm 99.9% sure it's on this website) and that was a huge help for this section, so I definitely recommend going over that. That file is also pretty helpful in general for the entire test, but don't rely on just that when you're studying.

- I didn't find the ANIT portion too difficult but there is a lot of information that you could be tested on here. On this section you can expect questions asking you to identify various parts of an aircraft and what they do, general naval terminology, and some questions on aviation history. I got a question on this sub-test asking me which aircraft was the first to use fly-by wire (it's the F-8 Crusader). Fortunately being an aviation/military history nerd, I knew that on the test but I definitely wasn't expecting that type of question. I also got a question asking me what the first supersonic jet was (the Bell XS-1) so I recommend brushing up on your aviation history. Another thing I would recommend studying are your squadron designators and the type of aircraft that different squadrons fly (i.e., VFAs fly Super Hornets, VAWs fly Hawkeyes, etc.) I also used the Accepted, Inc. ASTB study guide to study for this section and that helped quite a bit.

- For the directional orientation section (the one with the UAV asking you to ID various parking lots), a really helpful trick I used is to draw a compass rose on one of the pieces of scrap paper you're given. I believe another user, @Moriarty617 posted a YouTube video above explaining the trick, but here it is again for convenience:
.

- The PBM section on the exam was by far the most challenging. I thought I fought through it pretty well but I really don't think there's a way to truly study for it. I kind of just played Ace Combat using a stick and throttle set I borrowed from my roommate and practiced tracking targets in an effort to prepare for this section (which actually helped quite a bit, in all honesty) but other than that, I improvised a lot. When you're given the emergency procedures part of the PBM, write down the emergency procedures on a piece of scrap paper and reference that during the test so you don't have to commit them to memory.

Feel free to PM me or reply to this post if you have any questions, and I'll do my best to answer them. Good luck everyone!
 
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